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Original Research: Bronchiectasis |

Adult Patients With Bronchiectasis: A First Look at the US Bronchiectasis Research Registry

Timothy R. Aksamit, MD; Anne E. O’Donnell, MD; Alan Barker, MD; Kenneth N. Olivier, MD; Kevin L. Winthrop, MD; M. Leigh Anne Daniels, MD, MPH; Margaret Johnson, MD; Edward Eden, MD; David Griffith, MD; Michael Knowles, MD; Mark Metersky, MD; Matthias Salathe, MD; Byron Thomashow, MD; Gregory Tino, MD; Gerard Turino, MD; Betsy Carretta, MPH; Charles L. Daley, MD
Author and Funding Information

FUNDING/SUPPORT: This study was funded by the COPD Foundation and, in part (K. N. O.), by the Intramural Research Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.

aDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

bDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR

cDivision of Infectious Disease, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR

dCollaborative Studies Coordinating Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

eDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

fDivision of Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infections, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO

gDepartment of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center at Columbia University, New York, NY

hDepartment of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center at Columbia University, New York, NY

iPulmonary Infectious Disease Section, University of Texas Health Science Center, Tyler, TX

jDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL

kDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT

lDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC

mCardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD

nMiller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL

oCenter for Chest Disease, Columbia University Medical Center–NY Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY

pDepartment of Medicine, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA

qUniversity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Timothy R. Aksamit, MD, Department of Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905


Copyright 2016, . All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2017;151(5):982-992. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.10.055
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Objectives  We sought to describe the characteristics of adult patients with bronchiectasis enrolled in the US Bronchiectasis Research Registry (BRR).

Methods  The BRR is a database of patients with non-cystic-fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) enrolled at 13 sites in the United States. Baseline demographic, spirometric, imaging, microbiological, and therapeutic data were entered into a central Internet-based database. Patients were subsequently analyzed by the presence of NTM.

Results  We enrolled 1,826 patients between 2008 and 2014. Patients were predominantly women (79%), white (89%), and never smokers (60%), with a mean age of 64 ± 14 years. Sixty-three percent of the patients had a history of NTM disease or NTM isolated at baseline evaluation for entry into the BRR. Patients with NTM were older, predominantly women, and had bronchiectasis diagnosed at a later age than those without NTM. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was more common in those with NTM, whereas asthma, primary immunodeficiency, and primary ciliary dyskinesia were more common in those without NTM. Fifty-one percent of patients had spirometric evidence of airflow obstruction. Patients with NTM were more likely to have diffusely dilated airways and tree-in-bud abnormalities. Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus aureus isolates were cultured less commonly in patients with NTM. Bronchial hygiene measures were used more often in those with NTM, whereas antibiotics used for exacerbations, rotating oral antibiotics, steroid use, and inhaled bronchodilators were more commonly used in those without NTM.

Conclusions  Adult patients with bronchiectasis enrolled in the US BRR are described, with differences noted in demographic, radiographic, microbiological, and treatment variables based on stratification of the presence of NTM.

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