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Pharmacotherapeutics: Pharmacotherapuetics |

Advice for Patients Using Inhalers in Various Temperature and Altitude Conditions

Chelsea Morin, BS; Jordan Titosky, BS; Jonathan Suderman, BS; Warren Finlay, PhD; Mary Noseworthy, MD
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University of Calgary Department of Medicine, Calgary, AB, Canada


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;150(4_S):972A. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.08.1076
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SESSION TITLE: Pharmacotherapuetics

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of pressure and temperature on inhaler performance in order to help appropriately prescribe and educate patients on proper inhaler use.

METHODS: An in vitro testing apparatus was set up using industry standard inhaler testing devices. Inhalers were actuated during simulated inhalation and particles which traveled through the throat model and reached a downstream filter were measured as the in vitro lung deposition. Metered dose inhalers (MDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were tested at varying altitudes from 670m to 4300m. MDIs were also tested at a range of temperature conditions including inhaler and ambient temperatures of -10°C, 0°C, 10°C, 20°C and 40°C. The inhaler and ambient temperatures were varied separately in order to simulate real patient conditions.

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