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Critical Care: Sepsis II |

Outcomes for Septic Shock: A Comparison Between Teaching and Non-Teaching Hospitals

Shaun Noronha, MD; Swathi Sangli, MD; Boram Kim, DO; Pius Ochieng, MD; Raymonde Jean, MD
Author and Funding Information

Mt. Sinai West and Mt. Sinai St. Luke's Hospitals, New York, NY


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;150(4_S):364A. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.08.377
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SESSION TITLE: Sepsis II

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

PURPOSE: Septic shock is a serious complication of sepsis with high mortality rates despite aggressive treatment. According to the CDC, septic shock is the most frequent cause of death in intensive care units in the United States (US). It remains a global health care issue with a mortality rate exceeding 40% and contributes significantly to the $20 billion annual burden that sepsis levies on the healthcare system. Past studies have suggested that quality of care is higher in teaching hospitals than in nonteaching hospitals. There are no studies comparing outcomes for septic shock between the two in the US. We reviewed outcomes of septic shock, which included mortality, hospital length of stay and cost in teaching institutions as opposed to nonteaching hospitals.

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