0
Critical Care: Heme and infection ICU |

Can the Glasgow Blatchford Bleeding Score Be Used as a Criteria for Admission to the ICU in Cases of an Acute Gastrointestinal Bleed?

Scott Lieberman, MD; Ramon Valentin, DO; Luis Lara, MD; Ben Krempley, MS
Author and Funding Information

Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, FL


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;150(4_S):287A. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.08.300
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

SESSION TITLE: Heme and infection ICU

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Slide

PRESENTED ON: Sunday, October 23, 2016 at 07:30 AM - 08:30 AM

PURPOSE: Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for more than 300,000 hospital admissions per year. The mortality for such cases is about 5%-12%. Close to 50% of all patients diagnosed with an acute GI Bleed were inappropriately admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Furthermore, only 19%-28% of all GI bleed patients experience complications that warrant ICU interventions. 20%-30% of all hospital costs are attributed to the ICU. Inappropriate admission to the ICU results in a longer hospital stay, unnecessary cost burden and utilization of scare ICU resources. There is no universal consensus admission criteria for those patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding that warrant ICU admission as opposed to general medical floor admission. The goal of our study was to determine if the Glasgow Blatchford Score (GBS) could be used as an ICU admission criteria as well as which GBS factors were surrogates for hemodynamic instability.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543