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Chest Infections: Respiratory Care |

Determining Aspiration of Oral Secretions and the Potential Impact on Evaluation of Dysphagia and VAP in Patients With Tracheostomies Using an Automated Intermittent Subglottic Aspiration System

Gerald Gentile, RRT
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Eastchester Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center, Bronx, NY


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;150(4_S):153A. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.08.162
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SESSION TITLE: Respiratory Care

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

PURPOSE: The Modified Evans Blue Dye Test (MEBDT) has been formally used since 1995 to evaluate aspiration in patients with tracheostomies who frequently have dysphagia or other swallowing problems. In the test, clinicians deflate the cuff of the tracheal tube. Blue dye (typically FD&C Blue No. 1) is added to food (e.g. applesauce) and then fed to the patient. Following suctioning of the lower regions of the tracheal tube, past the deflated cuff, if any dye is seen in the suctioned fluids, the patient is diagnosed with a swallowing disorder, since the contaminated contents were drawn from the lower airways, where they can cause ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ventilator-associated events (VAE). The reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of the MEBDT have long been questioned. The test relies on important factors such as duration of suctioning and operator technique. False negative results have been shown to occur in over 50% of tests performed, putting patients at risk.

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