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Original Research: Pulmonary Vascular Disease |

Risks of Venous Thromboembolism After Cesarean Sections: A Meta-Analysis

Marc Blondon, MD; Alessandro Casini, MD; Kara K. Hoppe, DO; Françoise Boehlen, MD; Marc Righini, MD; Nicholas L. Smith, PhD
Author and Funding Information

FUNDING/SUPPORT: Dr Blondon was supported by a fellowship for prospective researchers from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

aDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis, Department of Specialties of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland

bDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Maternal Fetal Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

cDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

dSeattle Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development, Seattle, WA

eDepartment of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Marc Blondon, MD, Geneva University Hospitals, Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland.


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;150(3):572-596. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.05.021
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Background  Cesarean sections (CS) are believed to be associated with greater risks of postpartum VTE. Our objective was to systematically review the evidence on this association and on the absolute risk of VTE following CS.

Methods  We searched PubMed, Embase, and conference proceedings from 1980 to November 2015 for reports on the associations of delivery methods with postpartum VTE and on the incidence of VTE following CS. Studies on thrombophilia or recurrent VTE were excluded, and the search was restricted to prospective studies when assessing the incidence of VTE. Pooled relative and absolute risks were estimated with random effects models.

Results  The search retrieved 28 mostly retrospective observational studies comparing risks of VTE following CS and following vaginal deliveries (VD) (> 53,000 VTE events) and 32 prospective studies reporting risks of VTE following CS (218 VTE events). Compared with VD, the relative risk of VTE following CS ranged from 1 to 22, with a meta-analytic OR of 3.7 (95% CI, 3.0-4.6). Adjustment for age and BMI had a marginal influence on the estimated pooled OR. Associations were observed for both elective and emergency CS, with stronger estimates of associations for emergency CS. The pooled incidence was 2.6 VTE per 1,000 CS (95% CI, 1.7-3.5) and was greater in studies with a longer and better follow-up in the postpartum period (4.3 per 1,000 CS).

Conclusions  The risk of VTE was fourfold greater following CS than following VD; seemed independent of other VTE risk factors; and was greater following emergency CS than following elective CS. On average, three in 1,000 women will develop a VTE following CS.

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