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Sleep Disorders: Sleep Disorders I |

Evaluation of Transcutaneous Monitoring of CO2 Pressure in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep and Breathing Disorder FREE TO VIEW

Yanan Liu, MD
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Peking University First Hospital, Peking, China


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(4_S):A565. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.02.590
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SESSION TITLE: Sleep Disorders I

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Saturday, April 16, 2016 at 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical value of transcutaneous CO2 (TcPCO2) measurement in sleep respiratory monitoring

METHODS: Twenty nine patients (49.5±12.9) years old, Body mass index (BMI) (28.2±3.6) kg/m2) were prospectively recruited for the study. All of them underwent polysomnography (PSG) at the Sleep Center, Peking University People’s Hospital between January to August 2013. TcPCO2 signal was input to PSG systems, and TcPCO2 (TCM4, Radiometer, Demark) were measured simultaneously. Arterial blood gases (ABG) analysis for arterial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) were undertaken to validate TcPCO2 measurement and statistically analyzed by Pearson's product-moment correlation. Dynamic change of TcPCO2 was monitored in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep stages. Noninvasive positive airway pressure ventilation (NPPV) treatment effect on TcPCO2 during sleep was also observed.

RESULTS: TcPCO2 (44.2±4.0) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) was highly correlated with PaCO2 (43.2±4.7) mmHg (Pearson's correlation, r=0.896, P=0.000), TcPCO2 (45.8±5.4) mmHg level during wakefulness correlated significantly with that during N1, N2, N3 and REM sleep stage (r=0.658, 0.871, 0.898, 0.775; P=0.009, 0.000, 0.003, 0.000). TcPCO2 levels in different sleep stage were all higher than that of wakefulness. However, TcPCO2 levels between two sleep stages did not differ. The elevated TcPCO2 returned to the normal level on CPAP treatment in hypercapnia patients. TcPCO2 (66.52±8.75) mmHg fell to (53.36±7.94) mmHg during BIPAP reatment with significant differences

CONCLUSIONS: TcPCO2 (44.2±4.0) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) was highly correlated with PaCO2 (43.2±4.7) mmHg (Pearson's correlation, r=0.896, P=0.000), TcPCO2 (45.8±5.4) mmHg level during wakefulness correlated significantly with that during N1, N2, N3 and REM sleep stage (r=0.658, 0.871, 0.898, 0.775; P=0.009, 0.000, 0.003, 0.000). TcPCO2 levels in different sleep stage were all higher than that of wakefulness. However, TcPCO2 levels between two sleep stages did not differ. The elevated TcPCO2 returned to the normal level on CPAP treatment in hypercapnia patients. TcPCO2 (66.52±8.75) mmHg fell to (53.36±7.94) mmHg during BIPAP reatment with significant differences.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study has evaluated the accuracy of the PTCCO2 monitor as compared with PaCO2 in sleep disorder patients. We believe that this technique may be useful in PAP pressure titration, in which PaCO2 control is essential to management.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Yanan Liu

No Product/Research Disclosure Information


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