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Signs and Symptoms of Chest Diseases: Cough |

Incidence of Prolonged Postviral Cough After the Common Cold FREE TO VIEW

Peter Dicpinigaitis, MD; Howard Druce; Ron Eccles; Ronald Turner; Maryann Attah; Ashley Mann
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Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(4_S):A547. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.02.571
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SESSION TITLE: Cough

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Saturday, April 16, 2016 at 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

PURPOSE: Cough is the most common complaint for which individuals in the United States seek medical attention. The majority of the approximately 33 million annual cough-related visits to healthcare providers (Schappert SM and Burt CW, Vital Health Stat 13, 2006) are for evaluation of acute cough, defined as cough of <3 weeks’ duration (Irwin RS, et al, Chest, 2006). Although most episodes of cough due to acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI; common cold) are transient and self-limited (Dicpinigaitis PV, Br J Pharmacol, 2011), a significant proportion of patients suffer prolonged (subacute) cough, defined by a duration of 3-8 weeks (Irwin RS, et al, Chest, 2006). Subacute postviral cough is often refractory to standard treatment and presents a challenge to healthcare providers. The incidence of subacute cough following acute URI has not been well defined.

METHODS: A nationwide US Internet survey fielded in April 2015 evaluated those who experienced cough due to cold within the previous 3 months. Respondents with chronic cough (>8 weeks) or with a medical predisposition to cough were excluded. Response quotas ensured survey respondents were representative of US population demographics. Demographics, common cold symptoms, cough attributes, and impact of cough were elicited.

RESULTS: Of 19,530 respondents screened, 2,708 met inclusion criteria; 58% were female; 85% were white; 19% were active smokers. Experiencing the urge to cough (57.3%) and inability to control the cough (53.6%) were considered the most bothersome aspects of cough due to cold. Cough outlasted other cold symptoms in 68.9%. In 25.5% of individuals, cough outlasted all other common cold symptoms by 1-4 weeks. Cough persisted after resolution of other common cold symptoms for >4 weeks in 4.4% of respondents.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study has allowed an estimate of the incidence of subacute postviral cough following the common cold.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Given the number of common cold episodes annually, a postviral cough incidence of 4.4% represents a significant medical and economic burden.

DISCLOSURE: Peter Dicpinigaitis: Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Novartis Corp, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Pfizer Inc, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Reckitt Benckiser Group, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Boehringer-Ingelheim GmbH Howard Druce: Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Ron Eccles: Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Bayer, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Novartis Corp, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Pfizer Inc, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Procter & Gamble Ronald Turner: Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: GlaxoSmithKline, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Janssen Pharmaceutical R&D, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Pfizer, Other: Dupont Nutrition and Health, Other: Janssen Pharmaceutical R&D Maryann Attah: Employee: Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Ashley Mann: Employee: Pfizer Consumer Healthcare

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