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Pulmonary Physiology: Pulmonary Physiology |

Application of Impulse Oscillometry in Central Airway Obstruction FREE TO VIEW

Tang Haiyan, PhD
Author and Funding Information

Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(4_S):A485. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2016.02.505
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Published online

SESSION TITLE: Pulmonary Physiology

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Poster

PRESENTED ON: Saturday, April 16, 2016 at 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

PURPOSE: Central airway obstruction (CAO) is defined as airflow limitation in trachea, left and right main bronchus and bronchus intermedius. Causes of CAO are diverse, and mostly can be improved by interventional bronchoscopy. Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is one of the methods of measuring the resistance of the airways and has been used to assess airway obstruction, but limited data are available in patients with CAO. We conducted this retrospective study to assess the usefulness of IOS in central airway obstruction and whether the location and type of obstruction have impact on their IOS parameters.

METHODS: Between January 2008 and July 2014, patients with CAO, patients with peripheral airway obstruction (PAO) and patients without airway obstruction, which were confirmed either by bronchoscopy or computed tomography (CT) underwent IOS in the pulmonary function laboratory of first hospital, Peking University. IOS data were acquired, and the differences among patients with CAO, PAO and control group were calculated. p<0.05 is considered significantly different. Clinical information, bronchoscopic manifestations and lung function results were reviewed.

RESULTS: 67 patients with CAO, 57 patients with PAO, and 108 patients without airway obstruction enrolled. There were significant differences in Zrs, X5pred-X5, Fres among CAO, PAO and control group (p<0.05). Comparing CAO with PAO, only differences in R20%pred, R25%pred and R35%pred were significant (p value were 0.001, 0.005 and 0.001 respectively). There were also significant differences in IOS parameters in patients with tracheal obstruction, obstructions of left and right main bronchus as well as bronchus intermedius and mixed obstruction (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: IOS can be used to discriminate obstructive and non-obstructive airway disease. R5, R20 may be potentially used to differentiate central airway obstruction and peripheral airway obstruction, but much bigger sample size is needed. Both location and type of CAO have influences on IOS parameters.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: IOS can be used to discriminate obstructive and non-obstructive airway disease. R5, R20 may be potentially used to differentiate central airway obstruction and peripheral airway obstruction.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Tang Haiyan

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