0
Original Research: Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease |

Lung Function Trajectories in World Trade Center-Exposed New York City Firefighters Over 13 Years: The Roles of Smoking and Smoking Cessation

Thomas K. Aldrich, MD; Madeline Vossbrinck, MS; Rachel Zeig-Owens, DrPH; Charles B. Hall, PhD; Theresa M. Schwartz, MS; William Moir, MPH; Mayris P. Webber, DrPH; Hillel W. Cohen, DrPH; Anna Nolan, MD; Michael D. Weiden, MD; Vasilios Christodoulou, BA; Kerry J. Kelly, MD; David J. Prezant, MD
Author and Funding Information

FUNDING/SUPPORT: This project was supported by World Trade Center Health Program contracts (200-2011-39378 and 200-2011-39383) from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Thomas K. Aldrich, MD, Pulmonary Medicine Division, Montefiore Medical Center, 111 East 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(6):1419-1427. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2015.10.067
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background  World Trade Center (WTC)-exposed Fire Department of the City of New York firefighters lost, on average, 10% of lung function after September 11, 2011, and >10% developed new obstructive airways disease. There was little recovery (on average) over the first 6 years. Follow-up into the next decade allowed us to determine the longer-term exposure effects and the roles of cigarette smoking and cessation on lung function trajectories.

Methods  We examined serial measurements of FEV1 from March 11, 2000, to September 10, 2014, among 10,641 WTC-exposed Fire Department of the City of New York firefighters with known smoking and body weight histories.

Results  The median number of FEV1 measurements during follow-up was 9; 15% of firefighters arrived at the WTC during the morning of September 11, 2001; and 65% never smoked. Firefighters arriving the morning of September 11, 2001 averaged lower lung function than did lesser exposed firefighters; this difference remained significant during most of follow-up (P < .05). Never smokers had significantly better lung function than current smokers; former smokers fell in between, depending upon their cessation date. Those arriving the morning of September 11, 2001 were more likely to have an FEV1 < lower limits of normal compared with those arriving between September 13, 2001, and September 24, 2001 (OR = 1.70, P < .01). Current smokers were more likely to have an FEV1 < lower limits of normal compared with never smokers (OR = 2.06, P < .01), former smokers who quit before September 11, 2001 (OR = 1.96, P < .01), or those who quit between September 11, 2001 and March 10, 2008 (OR = 1.49, P < .01).

Conclusions  Thirteen years after September 11, 2001, most firefighters continued to show a lack of lung function recovery, with the trajectory of decline differing by WTC exposure and smoking status. Unlike the immutable effect of WTC exposure, we demonstrated the benefit on lung function of smoking cessation in this unique occupational/environmental cohort.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543