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Najib T. Ayas, MD, MPH; A. J. Marcus Hirsch Allen, MPH
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Respiratory Medicine (Dr Ayas), Vancouver Hospital; Sleep Disorders Program (Dr Ayas), University of British Columbia Hospital; and the Department of Experimental Medicine (Mr Hirsch Allen), University of British Columbia.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Najib T. Ayas, MD, MPH, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Vancouver Hospital and Health Science Centre, 2775 Laurel St, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 3J5, Canada; e-mail: nayas@providencehealth.bc.ca


CONFLICT OF INTEREST: N. T. A. has received money to be a speaker at a symposium about sleep apnea given to family physicians by a CPAP home care company and has received peer-reviewed funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to study sleep apnea. None declared (A. J. M. H. A.).

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(5):e166-e167. doi:10.1378/chest.15-1952
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To the Editor:

We thank Dr Garbarino and colleagues for their interest in our article.1 We completely agree with them that the issue of OSA in the workplace is very important. We apologize if we gave the impression that the link between OSA and occupational injuries was definitive. Indeed, we also believe that there is a relative paucity of studies in the field (which is why we chose the term “emerging” in the article) but agree that we likely should have been more explicit about the need for more high-quality studies in the field to direct policy.

Nevertheless, we believe that our narrative review was comprehensive, and we detailed the limitations of all the studies involving injuries (in Table 1 and the Conclusions section), including how OSA was defined; it is unclear how much a systematic review would be helpful in this context. In addition, there are not many studies, and these are very heterogeneous; thus, a meta-analysis would be challenging to perform and difficult to interpret.

In our opinion, more rehashing of published data likely will not advance us much farther. Instead, we believe that it is more important to search for evidence by generating more high-quality primary data to help inform policy and clinical decision-making.

References

Hirsch Allen AJM, Bansback N, Ayas NT. The effect of OSA on work disability and work-related injuries. Chest. 2015;147(5):1422-1428. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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References

Hirsch Allen AJM, Bansback N, Ayas NT. The effect of OSA on work disability and work-related injuries. Chest. 2015;147(5):1422-1428. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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