0
ONLINE EXCLUSIVES
Ultrasound Corner |

A 69-Year-Old Man With Dyspnea Following Lung BiopsyPost-Lung Biopsy Dyspnea

Christian B. Laursen, MD, PhD; Bill Frederiksen, MD; Stefan Posth, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Respiratory Medicine and Center for Thorax Oncology (Dr Laursen), Department of Rheumatology (Dr Frederiksen), and Department of Emergency Medicine (Dr Posth), Odense University Hospital; and Institute of Clinical Research (Drs Laursen and Posth), University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Christian B. Laursen, MD, PhD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Sdr Blvd 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; e-mail: christian.b.laursen@rsyd.dk


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(5):e139-e141. doi:10.1378/chest.14-3152
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

A 69-year-old man with COPD and ischemic heart disease was admitted with dyspnea to the ED. Nine hours prior to the admission, the patient had been seen in an outpatient clinic where a CT scan-guided biopsy of an opacity in the right lung had been performed. After the biopsy, the patient did not have any complaints. A control CT scan of the chest following the biopsy as well as a control chest radiograph 4 h after the biopsy had been performed did not have signs of pneumothorax or other complications. The patient was allowed to go home without any further observation.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

Video 1.

Case presentation video. Clip 1: Lung ultrasound (LUS) of the right anterior chest surface. Clip 2: LUS of right lateral chest surface corresponding to the biopsy puncture site. Clip 3: LUS of the right posterolateral chest surface.

Running Time: 01:24

Video 2.

Discussion video. Clip 1: LUS of the right anterior surface of the chest. Lung sliding (LS) is present, the diagnosis of pneumothorax can ruled out in the assessed area. Clip 2: LUS of right lateral chest surface corresponding to the biopsy puncture site. Lung sliding is absent but since multiple B-lines are present, localized pneumothorax at the puncture site can be ruled-out. Clip 3: LUS of the right posterolateral chest surface. No pleural effusion is present, thus ruling out a hemothorax. An area of consolidated lung tissue (LC) is present; the consolidation appears more hyperechogenic than the liver tissue (Lvr) which can be visualized below the diaphragm. The hyperechoic lung consolidation was suspected as representing intrapulmonary hemorrhage.

Running Time: 03:16

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543