0
Original Research: Sleep Disorders |

OSA Syndrome and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Clinical Outcomes and Impact of Positive Airway Pressure Therapy

Christopher J. Lettieri, MD; Scott G. Williams, MD; Jacob F. Collen, MD
Author and Funding Information

FUNDING/SUPPORT: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Jacob F. Collen, MD, Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, (Brooke Army Medical Center), 3551 Roger Brooke Dr, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234


Copyright 2016, . All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(2):483-490. doi:10.1378/chest.15-0693
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background  We sought to determine the impact of OSA syndrome (OSAS) on symptoms and quality of life (QoL) among patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, we assessed adherence and response to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy in this population.

Methods  This was a case-controlled observational cohort study at the Sleep Disorders Center of an academic military medical center. Two hundred consecutive patients with PTSD underwent sleep evaluations. Patients with PTSD with and without OSAS were compared with 50 consecutive age-matched patients with OSAS without PTSD and 50 age-matched normal control subjects. Polysomnographic data, sleep-related symptoms and QoL measures, and objective PAP usage were obtained.

Results  Among patients with PTSD, more than one-half (56.6%) received a diagnosis of OSAS. Patients with PTSD and OSAS had lower QoL and more somnolence compared with the other groups. Patients with PTSD demonstrated significantly lower adherence and response to PAP therapy. Resolution of sleepiness occurred in 82% of patients with OSAS alone, compared with 62.5% of PAP-adherent and 21.4% of nonadherent patients with PTSD and OSAS (P < .001). Similarly, posttreatment Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire ≥ 17.9 was achieved in 72% of patients with OSAS, compared with only 56.3% of patients with PTSD and OSA who were PAP adherent and 26.2% who were nonadherent (P < .03).

Conclusions  In patients with PTSD, comorbid OSAS is associated with worsened symptoms, QoL, and adherence and response to PAP. Given the negative impact on outcomes, the possibility of OSAS should be considered carefully in patients with PTSD. Close follow-up is needed to optimize PAP adherence and efficacy in this at-risk population.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543