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Original Research: Genetic and Developmental Disorders |

Changing Epidemiology of the Respiratory Bacteriology of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

Elizabeth L. Salsgiver, MPH; Aliza K. Fink, DSc; Emily A. Knapp, BA; John J. LiPuma, MD; Kenneth N. Olivier, MD; Bruce C. Marshall, MD; Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH
Author and Funding Information

Ms Salsgiver is currently at the Weill Cornell Medical Center (New York, NY).

FUNDING/SUPPORT: This study was supported by the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 650 W 168th St, PH 4 W Room 470, New York, NY 10032


Copyright 2016, American College of Chest Physicians. All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(2):390-400. doi:10.1378/chest.15-0676
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Background  Monitoring potential changes in the epidemiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens furthers our understanding of the potential impact of interventions.

Methods  We performed a retrospective analysis using data reported to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR) from 2006 to 2012 to determine the annual percent changes in the prevalence and incidence of selected CF pathogens. Pathogens included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), Haemophilus influenzae, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Changes in nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) prevalence were assessed from 2010 to 2012, when the CFFPR collected NTM species.

Results  In 2012, the pathogens of highest prevalence and incidence were MSSA and P aeruginosa, followed by MRSA. The prevalence of A xylosoxidans and B cepacia complex were relatively low. From 2006 to 2012, the annual percent change in overall (as well as in most age strata) prevalence and incidence significantly decreased for P aeruginosa and B cepacia complex, but significantly increased for MRSA. From 2010 to 2012, the annual percent change in overall prevalence of NTM and Mycobaterium avium complex increased.

Conclusions  The epidemiology of CF pathogens continues to change. The causes of these observations are most likely multifactorial and include improvements in clinical care and infection prevention and control. Data from this study will be useful to evaluate the impact of new therapies on CF microbiology.

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