0
Original Research: Pulmonary Vascular Disease |

Validation of the International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism Bleeding Risk Score

David C. Hostler, MAJ; Elizabeth S. Marx, CPT; Lisa K. Moores, COL; Sarah K. Petteys, CPT; Jordanna Mae Hostler, MAJ; Joshua D. Mitchell, MAJ; Paul R. Holley, MS; Jacob F. Collen, LTC; Brian E. Foster, CPT; Aaron B. Holley, LTC
Author and Funding Information

FUNDING/SUPPORT: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: LTC Aaron Holley, MC, USA, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, 8901 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD 20889


Copyright 2016, . All Rights Reserved.


Chest. 2016;149(2):372-379. doi:10.1378/chest.14-2842
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background  Recent guidelines recommend assessing medical inpatients for bleeding risk prior to providing chemical prophylaxis for VTE. The International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) bleeding risk score (BRS) was derived from a well-defined population of medical inpatients but it has not been validated externally. We sought to externally validate the IMPROVE BRS.

Methods  We prospectively collected characteristics on admission and VTE prophylaxis data each hospital day for all patients admitted for a medical illness to the Walter Reed Army Medical Center over an 18-month period. We calculated the IMPROVE BRS for each patient using admission data and reviewed medical records to identify bleeding events.

Results  From September 2009 through March 2011, 1,668 inpatients met the IMPROVE inclusion criteria. Bleeding events occurred during 45 separate admissions (2.7%); 31 events (1.9%) were major and 14 (0.8%) were nonmajor but clinically relevant. Two hundred fifty-six patients (20.7%) had an IMPROVE BRS ≥ 7.0. Kaplan-Meier curves showed a higher cumulative incidence of major (P = .02) and clinically important (major plus clinically relevant nonmajor) (P = .06) bleeding within 14 days in patients with an IMPROVE BRS ≥ 7.0. An IMPROVE BRS ≥ 7.0 was associated with major bleeding in Cox-regression analysis adjusted for administration of chemical prophylaxis (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1-5.9; P = .03); there was a trend toward a significant association with clinically important bleeding (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9-3.7; P = .07).

Conclusions  The IMPROVE BRS calculated at admission predicts major bleeding in medical inpatients. This model may help assess the relative risks of bleeding and VTE before chemoprophylaxis is administered.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543