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Neil C. Thomson, MD; Charles McSharry, PhD; Rekha Chaudhuri, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Neil C. Thomson, MD, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow and Respiratory Medicine, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, G12 OYN, Scotland; e-mail: neil.thomson@glasgow.ac.uk


FINANCIAL/NONFINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

FUNDING/SUPPORT: This work was funded by an award [INF-GU-090] from the Translational Medicine Research Collaboration, a consortium made up of the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and Dundee; the four associated National Health Service (NHS) Health Boards (Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Lothian, Grampian, and Tayside); Scottish Enterprise; and Pfizer (formerly Wyeth). This study was also supported financially by NHS Research Scotland (NRS) through the Scottish Primary Care Research Network.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(1):e33-e34. doi:10.1378/chest.15-0890
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To the Editor:

We read with interest the comments of Mr Ross and Dr Sebbage on our article in CHEST1 in which we reported that the CT scan segmental airway lumen area is reduced in smokers with asthma compared with never smokers with asthma, particularly in severe disease, and is associated with worse current symptom control and small airway dysfunction. Mr Ross and Dr Sebbage suggest that the reduction in airway lumen found in smokers with asthma may reflect the adverse effects of lower socioeconomic status in early life on lung function in the smokers group.2,3 As noted by Mr Ross and Dr Sebbage, height is considered a marker of socioeconomic status,4 and although we found that height was similar between never smokers with asthma and smokers with asthma (1.67 m [1.58, 1.75] and 1.67 m [1.62, 1.77], respectively; P = .814), we acknowledge that we cannot exclude lower socioeconomic status in early life influencing airway lumen area. The cross-sectional nature of the study precludes us from answering this interesting hypothesis.

We also thank Mr Ross and Dr Sebbage for pointing out the transcription error in Table 1 of our article.1 The correct median (interquartile range) for left bronchial 3 lumen area in never smokers with asthma and smokers with asthma is as follows: 21.7 mm2 (16.0, 27.7) and 19.3 mm2 (16.8, 26.2), respectively (P = .532).

Acknowledgments

Role of sponsors: The sponsors had no role in the design of the study, the collection and analysis of the data, or the preparation of the manuscript.

Thomson NC, Chaudhuri R, Spears M, et al. Poor symptom control is associated with reduced CT scan segmental airway lumen area in smokers with asthma. Chest. 2015;147(3):735-744. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Gray LA, Leyland AH, Benzeval M, Watt GC. Explaining the social patterning of lung function in adulthood at different ages: the roles of childhood precursors, health behaviours and environmental factors. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013;67(11):905-911. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Eastwood P. Statistics on Smoking. Leeds, England: Health and Social Care Information Centre; 2013.
 
Ward K, Hubbard R. Is adult height related to the risk of having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? J Epidemiol Community Health. 2011;65(3):226-229. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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References

Thomson NC, Chaudhuri R, Spears M, et al. Poor symptom control is associated with reduced CT scan segmental airway lumen area in smokers with asthma. Chest. 2015;147(3):735-744. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Gray LA, Leyland AH, Benzeval M, Watt GC. Explaining the social patterning of lung function in adulthood at different ages: the roles of childhood precursors, health behaviours and environmental factors. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013;67(11):905-911. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Eastwood P. Statistics on Smoking. Leeds, England: Health and Social Care Information Centre; 2013.
 
Ward K, Hubbard R. Is adult height related to the risk of having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? J Epidemiol Community Health. 2011;65(3):226-229. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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