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Rebuttal From Dr EnrightRebuttal From Dr Enright

Paul L. Enright, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the University of Arizona (retired).

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Paul L. Enright, MD, PO Box 675, Mount Lemmon, AZ 85619; e-mail: lungguy@gmail.com


CONFLICT OF INTEREST: P. L. E. has been reimbursed for travel expenses by professional societies during the past 3 years for giving talks at international meetings about pulmonary function testing. These societies were often given funding for these talks by ndd Medical Technologies, Inc, which does not make a forced oscillation technique instrument.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(5):1138-1139. doi:10.1378/chest.15-1039
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Several years ago while working with Drs Berger, Goldring, and Oppenheimer evaluating people who were exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes, I found them to be excellent pulmonary physiologists, and I appreciate the high quality of their research using pulmonary function tests, such as forced oscillometry technique (FOT). Studies showing that an FOT index is abnormal more often than spirometry in smokers or people exposed to respiratory hazards in the workplace may merely mean that the false positive rate for oscillometry is higher than that for spirometry. An up-to-date review referenced by Dr Berger and colleagues1 regarding the diagnostic value of FOT concluded that “it is unclear whether any of these measures of airway resistance contribute clinically important information to the traditional measures derived from spirometry (FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC).”2

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