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Workplace Blame and Related ConceptsBlame-Related Distress: An Analysis of Three Case Studies

Judy E. Davidson, DNP, RN; Donna L. Agan, EdD; Shannon Chakedis, RN, MSN, OCN; Yoanna Skrobik, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Education, Research and Development (Dr Davidson) and Moore’s Cancer Center (Ms Chakedis), University of California San Diego Health System, San Diego, CA; Scripps Mercy Hospital (Dr Agan), San Diego, CA; McGill University Department of Medicine (Dr Skrobik), McGill University, Montreal, QC; and the Critical Care Division (Dr Skrobik), Kingston General Hospital, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Judy E. Davidson, DNP, RN, University of California San Diego Health System, 200 W Arbor Dr, San Diego, CA 92103; e-mail: jdavidson@ucsd.edu


This study has been presented previously at the Oncology Nursing Society, May 3, 2014, Los Angeles, CA; the Sigma Θ τ Odyssey Research Conference, November 13, 2014, Ontario, CA; and the National Teaching Institute, May 17, 2015, San Diego CA.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(2):543-549. doi:10.1378/chest.15-0332
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Blame has been thought to affect quality by decreasing error reporting. Very little is known about the incidence, characteristics, or consequences of the distress caused by being blamed. Blame-related distress (B-RD) may be related to moral distress, but may also be a factor in burnout, compassion fatigue, lateral violence, and second-victim syndrome. The purpose of this article is to explore these related concepts through a literature review applied to three index critical care clinician cases.


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