0
Commentary |

Timing the First Postoperative Dose of AnticoagulantsTiming of Postoperative Anticoagulation: Lessons Learned From Clinical Trials

Jeremy S. Paikin, MD; Jack Hirsh, MD; Noel C. Chan, MBBS; Jeffrey S. Ginsberg, MD; Jeffrey I. Weitz, MD, FCCP; John W. Eikelboom, MBBS
Author and Funding Information

From Hamilton General Hospital (Drs Paikin, Weitz, and Eikelboom), Department of Medicine (Drs Hirsh, Ginsberg, Weitz, and Eikelboom), Population Health Research Institute (Drs Chan and Eikelboom), and Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute (Drs Weitz and Eikelboom), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Jeremy S. Paikin, MD, Hamilton Health Sciences-Hamilton General Hospital, McMaster University, 237 Barton St E, Hamilton, ON, L8L 2X2, Canada; e-mail: paikinjs@mcmaster.ca


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;148(3):587-595. doi:10.1378/chest.14-2710
Text Size: A A A
Published online

The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), rivaroxaban, apixaban, and dabigatran, have been shown in phase 3 trials to be effective for thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty. Results from prior studies suggested that the safety of anticoagulants in such patients was improved if the first postoperative dose was delayed for at least 6 h after surgery. The timing of the first postoperative dose of the NOACs tested in phase 2 studies differed among the three NOACs: dabigatran was started 1 to 4 h postoperatively, whereas rivaroxaban and apixaban were started at least 6 and 12 h, postoperatively, respectively. Our review of the timing of initiation of thromboprophylaxis in randomized trials provides three related lessons. First, clinical trials performed before the NOACs were evaluated demonstrated that delaying the first dose of prophylactic anticoagulation until after major surgery is effective and safe. Second, the optimal timing of the first dose of prophylactic anticoagulation after surgery depends on the dose that is selected. Third, the results of the phase 3 trials with NOACs for thromboprophylaxis support the concept that acceptable efficacy and safety can be achieved when the appropriate first postoperative dose of anticoagulant is delayed for at least 6 h after surgery.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543