0
Original Research: COPD |

Pain and Its Clinical Associations in Individuals With COPDPain and Its Clinical Associations in COPD: A Systematic Review

Annemarie L. Lee, PhD; Samantha L. Harrison, PhD; Roger S. Goldstein, MBChB, FCCP; Dina Brooks, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Respiratory Medicine (Drs Lee, Harrison, Goldstein, and Brooks), West Park Healthcare Centre; and Department of Physical Therapy (Drs Lee, Harrison, Goldstein, and Brooks) and Department of Medicine (Dr Goldstein), University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Dina Brooks, PhD, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, 160-500 University Ave, Toronto, ON, M5G 1V7, Canada; e-mail: dina.brooks@utoronto.ca


FUNDING/SUPPORT: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;147(5):1246-1258. doi:10.1378/chest.14-2690
Text Size: A A A
Published online

BACKGROUND:  Pain is emerging as a clinical complication in COPD, but the clinical impact of this comorbidity and the measurement properties of instruments used to assess pain require evaluation.

METHODS:  Electronic searches of five databases were performed up to September 2014 for the two phases of this review. To be included in phase 1, studies reported the clinical associations of pain and prevalence in individuals with COPD. To be included in phase 2, studies reported measurement properties of an instrument assessing pain in COPD. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of quantitative and qualitative evidence (phase 1) and the measurement properties using the four-point Consensus‐Based Standards for the Selection of Health Status Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist (phase 2).

RESULTS:  Of the 358 studies identified in the literature, nine met the inclusion criteria for phase 1 and five for phase 2. The mean (SD) quality score (of 16) for the quantitative studies was 13.1 (1.7). The pooled prevalence of pain in moderate to very severe COPD was 66% (95% CI, 44%-85%). Higher pain intensity was associated with increased dyspnea, fatigue, poorer quality of life, and a greater quantity of specific comorbidities. Of the two identified instruments (Brief Pain Inventory and McGill Pain Questionnaire), the measurement properties analyzed were construct validity, internal consistency, and criterion-predictive validity, with variable findings based on “fair” or “poor” quality studies.

CONCLUSIONS:  In people with COPD, pain has negative clinical associations with symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Further research exploring the measurement properties of instruments assessing pain is required.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543