0
Original Research: Asthma |

Acute Effect of an Inhaled Glucocorticosteroid on Albuterol-Induced Bronchodilation in Patients With Moderately Severe AsthmaMometasone, Airway Blood Flow, and Albuterol

Eliana S. Mendes, MD; Lilian Cadet, RT; Johana Arana; Adam Wanner, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Eliana S. Mendes, MD, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave #7064-A, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136; e-mail: emendes@med.miami.edu


FUNDING/SUPPORT: This study was supported by an academic grant from Merck & Co, Inc.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;147(4):1037-1042. doi:10.1378/chest.14-1742
Text Size: A A A
Published online

BACKGROUND:  We have previously shown that in patients with asthma a single dose of an inhaled glucocorticosteroid (ICS) acutely potentiates inhaled albuterol-induced airway vascular smooth muscle relaxation through a nongenomic action. An effect on airway smooth muscle was not seen, presumably because the patients had normal lung function. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a similar study in patients with asthma with airflow obstruction to determine if an ICS could acutely also potentiate albuterol-induced airway smooth muscle relaxation in them.

METHODS:  In 15 adult patients with asthma (mean ± SE baseline FEV1, 62% ± 3%), the response to inhaled albuterol (180 μg) was assessed by determining the change in FEV1 (ΔFEV1) for airway smooth muscle and in airway blood flow (ΔQaw) for airway vascular smooth muscle measured 15 min after drug inhalation. Using a double-blind design, the patients inhaled a single dose of the ICS mometasone (400 μg) or placebo simultaneously with or 30 min before albuterol inhalation.

RESULTS:  After simultaneous drug administration, mean ΔFEV1 was 0.20 ± 0.05 L (10%) after placebo and 0.32 ± 0.04 L (19%) after mometasone (P < .05); mean ΔQaw was −2% after placebo and 30% after mometasone (P < .005). When mometasone or placebo was administered 30 min before albuterol, there was a lesser and insignificant difference in ΔFEV1 between the two treatments, whereas the difference in ΔQaw remained significant.

CONCLUSIONS:  This pilot study showed that in adult patients with asthma with airflow obstruction, a single standard dose of an ICS can acutely increase the FEV1 response to a standard dose of inhaled albuterol administered simultaneously. The associated potentiation of albuterol-induced vasodilation in the airway was of greater magnitude and retained when the ICS was administered 30 min before albuterol. The clinical significance of this observation will have to be established by a study involving a larger patient cohort.

TRIAL REGISTRY:  ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01210170; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
Management of asthma.
Singapore Ministry of Health | 7/18/2008
Adapting your practice: treatment and recommendations for homeless patients with asthma.
National Health Care for the Homeless Council, Inc. | 6/13/2008
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543