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Correspondence |

Copy, Paste, and Cloned Electronic RecordsCopy, Paste, and Cloned Electronic Records FREE TO VIEW

E. Michael Canham, MD, FCCP; Michael J. Weaver, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Medicine (Dr Canham), Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, National Jewish Health; and the State of Colorado Disability Determination Services (Dr Weaver).

CORRESPONDENCE TO: E. Michael Canham, MD, FCCP, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson St, J219, Denver, CO 80206; e-mail: CanhamM@njhealth.org


FINANCIAL/NONFINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;146(3):e101. doi:10.1378/chest.14-0759
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To the Editor:

We read with great interest and appreciation the article by Weis and Levy1 and the editorial by Koppel2 in a recent issue of CHEST (March 2014). If we may make additional observations about the day-to-day review of records from those of us that perform health information reviews, there are more problems. One of us is on the faculty at National Jewish Health and consults on many out-of-state patients. The number of records brought has significantly risen over time. One such patient arrived with 4,000 pages (electronically counted) for their consult. Where does the physician begin? With the patient and not with the too numerous records! It is very difficult to perform complex consultations buried in records of which only a few pages are actually helpful.

Both of us are consultants for the State of Colorado Disability Determination Services, and we peruse records from 30 to 5,000 pages per case. The massive increase in generated records over the past few years has contributed to slowing of the review and adjudication process. A single office visit may extend over five pages of records, of which only two sentences are different from the report of prior visits and no additional assessment or plans are recorded. The cut and paste of detailed physical examinations, often of body parts not relevant to the visit, cast doubt on the validity of any recorded physical findings. Often, there are contradictory statements within the same physical examination, making it difficult to know which is correct. A diagnosis, once considered, is propagated endlessly on the often cut and pasted but never edited problem list, even after it is discarded. It is often difficult to find the trees of useful information in the forest of cut and paste. This unintentional slowdown increases taxpayer costs and the time that severely disabled people must wait for disability payments. We applaud your thoughts and efforts, and hope your insight will ease our lives in the future.

References

Weis JM, Levy PC. Copy, paste, and cloned notes in electronic health records: prevalence, benefits, risks, and best practice recommendations. Chest. 2014;145(3):632-638. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Koppel R. Illusions and delusions of cut, pasted, and cloned notes: ephemeral reality and pixel prevarications. Chest. 2014;145(3):444-445. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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References

Weis JM, Levy PC. Copy, paste, and cloned notes in electronic health records: prevalence, benefits, risks, and best practice recommendations. Chest. 2014;145(3):632-638. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Koppel R. Illusions and delusions of cut, pasted, and cloned notes: ephemeral reality and pixel prevarications. Chest. 2014;145(3):444-445. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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