0
Contemporary Reviews in Sleep Medicine |

Clinical Applications of Adaptive Servoventilation DevicesAdaptive Servoventilation: Part 2: Part 2

Shahrokh Javaheri, MD, FCCP; Lee K. Brown, MD, FCCP; Winfried J. Randerath, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the College of Medicine (Dr Javaheri), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Brown), School of Medicine, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; and Zentrum für Schlaf- und Beatmungsmedizin Aufderhöher (Dr Randerath), Institut für Pneumologie an der Universität Witten/Herdecke, Klinik für Pneumologie und Allergologie, Krankenhaus Bethanien, Solingen, Germany.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Shahrokh Javaheri, MD, FCCP; e-mail: shahrokhjavaheri@icloud.com


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;146(3):858-868. doi:10.1378/chest.13-1778
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) is an automated treatment modality used to treat many types of sleep-disordered breathing. Although default settings are available, clinician-specified settings determined in the sleep laboratory are preferred. Depending on the device, setting choices may include a fixed expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) level or a range for autotitrating EPAP; minimum and maximum inspiratory positive airway pressure or pressure support values; and type of backup rate algorithm or a selectable fixed backup rate. ASV was initially proposed for treatment of central sleep apnea and Hunter-Cheyne-Stokes breathing associated with congestive heart failure (CHF), and numerous observational studies have demonstrated value in this setting. Other studies have reported varying efficacy in patients with complex sleep apnea syndromes, including those with mixtures of obstructive and central sleep-disordered breathing associated with CHF, renal failure, or OSA with central apneas developing on conventional positive airway pressure therapy. Patients with opioid-induced sleep apnea, both obstructive and central, may also respond to ASV. The variability in response to ASV in a given patient along with the myriad choices of specific models and settings demand a high degree of expertise from the clinician. Finally, randomized controlled studies are needed to determine long-term clinical efficacy of these devices.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543