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Giants in Chest Medicine |

Giants in Chest MedicineGiants in Chest Medicine: Margaret Turner-Warwick: Margaret Turner-Warwick, DBE, DM, PhD FREE TO VIEW

Peter J. Barnes, DM, DSc, Master FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Peter Barnes, DM, DSc, Master FCCP, is from the National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Peter Barnes, DM, DSc, Master FCCP, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Dovehouse St, London, SW3 6LY, England; e-mail: p.j.barnes@imperial.ac.uk


FINANCIAL/NONFINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: See video interview of Dr Turner-Warwick online at: http://youtu.be/UGsNuj2POt8

Editor’s Note: This series recognizes and highlights the accomplishments of individuals who have contributed greatly to chest medicine. To view the video interview with Dr Turner-Warwick, go to journal.publications.chestnet.org

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;146(3):545-546. doi:10.1378/chest.14-0076
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Published online

Margaret Turner-Warwick, DBE, DM, PhD, is a very appropriate choice as a Giant in Chest Medicine as she has had a major influence on research and understanding of pulmonary disease over a long period. She was born in London in 1924 and is related to Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of the Boy Scout movement. She studied physiology at Oxford University and qualified in medicine at University College Hospital in London in 1950. During the same year, she married Richard Turner-Warwick, who she met in Oxford and who went on to become a distinguished urologic surgeon. After junior medical posts in London, she decided on a career in respiratory medicine after working at the Brompton Hospital, then as now the major respiratory center in the United Kingdom.

Giants in Chest Medicine: Dame Margaret Turner-Warwick

CHEST Editor Peter J. Barnes, DM, Master FCCP, interviews Dame Margaret Turner-Warwick

Dr Turner-Warwick obtained her first post as a specialist in respiratory medicine at Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London, which was staffed entirely by female doctors and treated female patients. In 1957, she moved to a research post at Brompton Hospital to work with Guy Scadding, MD, who was head of the Cardiovascular Research Institute, a postgraduate institute of London University. In Professor Scadding’s department, she undertook important work on pulmonary fibrosis and established a clinical interest in interstitial lung disease, autoimmunity in the lung, and asthma. She was appointed as a senior lecturer (assistant professor) in 1960 and then succeeded Professor Scadding as professor of thoracic medicine in 1972. Dr Turner-Warwick subsequently became the head and dean of the Cardiothoracic Institute (1984-1987), which became the National Heart & Lung Institute and was incorporated into Imperial College London. After a very distinguished career, she retired from this post in 1987 and was then elected as the first-ever female president (1989-1992) of the Royal College of Physicians in London in its 500-year history.

Margaret Turner-Warwick, DBE, DM, PhDGrahic Jump Location

Her contributions to medical research and practice were recognized by her appointment as a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1991. During her career, Dr Turner-Warwick has made many important contributions to understanding interstitial lung disease and attracted patient referrals from throughout the United Kingdom and beyond. She also recognized the importance of different patterns of asthma and was involved in several important clinical trials in asthma and interstitial lung disease. Since her retirement, she has continued to be actively involved in various medical affairs and was chairperson of her local health authority for 3 years. In the interview, Dr Turner-Warwick discusses her medical and research career, the problems facing women in medicine, her research into interstitial lung disease and asthma, and her time as the first female president of the Royal College of Physicians at a time of many changes to the UK National Health System.

Turner-Warwick M. Study of theophylline plasma levels after oral administration of new theophylline compounds. BMJ. 1957;2(5036):67-69. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Turner-Warwick M. Systemic arterial patterns in the lung and clubbing of the fingers. Thorax. 1963;18:238-250. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Soutar CA, Costello J, Ijaduola O, Turner-Warwick M. Nocturnal and morning asthma. Relationship to plasma corticosteroids and response to cortisol infusion. Thorax. 1975;30(4):436-440. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Geddes DM, Corrin B, Brewerton DA, Davies RJ, Turner-Warwick M. Progressive airway obliteration in adults and its association with rheumatoid disease. Q J Med. 1977;46(184):427-444. [PubMed]
 
Turner-Warwick M. On observing patterns of airflow obstruction in chronic asthma. Br J Dis Chest. 1977;71(2):73-86. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Rudd RM, Haslam PL, Turner-Warwick M. Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Relationships of pulmonary physiology and bronchoalveolar lavage to response to treatment and prognosis. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1981;124(1):1-8. [PubMed]
 
Tschopp JM, Turner-Warwick M. Persisting airflow limitation in asthmatics receiving routine self-adjusted medication. Eur J Respir Dis. 1984;65(5):346-353. [PubMed]
 
Lin YH, Haslam PL, Turner-Warwick M. Chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis: relationship between lung lavage cell counts, chest radiograph, and results of standard lung function tests. Thorax. 1985;40(7):501-507. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Johnson MA, Kwan S, Snell NJ, Nunn AJ, Darbyshire JH, Turner-Warwick M. Randomised controlled trial comparing prednisolone alone with cyclophosphamide and low dose prednisolone in combination in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Thorax. 1989;44(4):280-288. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Harrison NK, Myers AR, Corrin B, et al. Structural features of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144(3 pt 1):706-713. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

Figures

Margaret Turner-Warwick, DBE, DM, PhDGrahic Jump Location

Tables

Giants in Chest Medicine: Dame Margaret Turner-Warwick

CHEST Editor Peter J. Barnes, DM, Master FCCP, interviews Dame Margaret Turner-Warwick

Suggested Readings

Turner-Warwick M. Study of theophylline plasma levels after oral administration of new theophylline compounds. BMJ. 1957;2(5036):67-69. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Turner-Warwick M. Systemic arterial patterns in the lung and clubbing of the fingers. Thorax. 1963;18:238-250. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Soutar CA, Costello J, Ijaduola O, Turner-Warwick M. Nocturnal and morning asthma. Relationship to plasma corticosteroids and response to cortisol infusion. Thorax. 1975;30(4):436-440. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Geddes DM, Corrin B, Brewerton DA, Davies RJ, Turner-Warwick M. Progressive airway obliteration in adults and its association with rheumatoid disease. Q J Med. 1977;46(184):427-444. [PubMed]
 
Turner-Warwick M. On observing patterns of airflow obstruction in chronic asthma. Br J Dis Chest. 1977;71(2):73-86. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Rudd RM, Haslam PL, Turner-Warwick M. Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Relationships of pulmonary physiology and bronchoalveolar lavage to response to treatment and prognosis. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1981;124(1):1-8. [PubMed]
 
Tschopp JM, Turner-Warwick M. Persisting airflow limitation in asthmatics receiving routine self-adjusted medication. Eur J Respir Dis. 1984;65(5):346-353. [PubMed]
 
Lin YH, Haslam PL, Turner-Warwick M. Chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis: relationship between lung lavage cell counts, chest radiograph, and results of standard lung function tests. Thorax. 1985;40(7):501-507. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Johnson MA, Kwan S, Snell NJ, Nunn AJ, Darbyshire JH, Turner-Warwick M. Randomised controlled trial comparing prednisolone alone with cyclophosphamide and low dose prednisolone in combination in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Thorax. 1989;44(4):280-288. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Harrison NK, Myers AR, Corrin B, et al. Structural features of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144(3 pt 1):706-713. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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