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Original Research: Pulmonary Procedures |

Lung Ultrasonography for the Diagnosis of Severe Neonatal PneumoniaUltrasound for Diagnosis of Neonatal Pneumonia

Jing Liu, MD, PhD; Fang Liu, MD; Ying Liu, MD; Hua-Wei Wang, MD; Zhi-Chun Feng, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Neonatology & NICU of Bayi Children’s Hospital (Drs J. Liu, F. Liu, Y. Liu, Wang, and Feng), Beijing Military General Hospital, Beijing; Graduate School of Southern Medical University (Dr F. Liu), Guangzhou City; and Graduate School of Anhui Medical University (Drs Y. Liu and Wang), Hefei City, China.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Jing Liu, MD, PhD, Department of Neonatology & NICU of Bayi Children’s Hospital, Beijing Military General Hospital, 5 Nanmen Cang, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100700, China; e-mail: Liujingbj@live.cn


FUNDING/SUPPORT: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;146(2):383-388. doi:10.1378/chest.13-2852
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Published online

BACKGROUND:  Lung ultrasonography is useful for the diagnosis of pneumonia in children and adults. This study investigated the lung ultrasound findings in severe neonatal pneumonia.

METHODS:  From September 2012 to October 2013, 80 neonates admitted to Bayi Children’s Hospital, affiliated with the Beijing Military General Hospital, were divided into two groups: 40 neonates with severe pneumonia according to their medical history, clinical manifestations, and chest radiograph findings and 40 neonates with no lung disease (control group). All subjects underwent bedside lung ultrasound examination in a quiet state. A single expert physician performed all ultrasound examinations. Findings of pleural line abnormalities, B lines, lung consolidation, air bronchograms, bilateral white lung, interstitial syndrome, lung sliding, and lung pulse were compared between the groups.

RESULTS:  The lung ultrasound findings associated with infectious pneumonia included large areas of lung consolidation with irregular margins and air bronchograms, pleural line abnormalities, and interstitial syndrome. A large area of lung consolidation with irregular margins had 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the diagnosis of neonatal pneumonia.

CONCLUSIONS:  Lung ultrasonography is a reliable tool for diagnosing neonatal pneumonia. It is suitable for routine use in the neonatal ICU and may eventually replace chest radiography and CT scanning.

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Video_1-Lung_Sliding

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Video_2-B_line

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Video_3-Lung_pulse

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