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Phillip D. Levin, MBBChir; Josh Moss; Sheldon Stohl, MD; Elchanan Fried, MD; Matan J. Cohen, MD; Charles L. Sprung, MD, FCCP; Shmuel Benenson, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine (Drs Levin, Stohl, Fried, and Sprung), Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (Drs Cohen and Benenson), Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center; and The Medical School (Mr Moss), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Correspondence to: Phillip D. Levin, MBBChir, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, POB 12000, Jerusalem 91120, Israel; e-mail: phillipl@hadassah.org.il


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;145(2):431. doi:10.1378/chest.13-2665
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To the Editor:

We thank Dr Bloos and colleagues for sharing their results with us, and we are pleased to receive further validation of our recently published results.1 Regarding the discrepancy between blood culture and polymerase chain reaction results, we suggest an alternative explanation relating to the order in which the tests were taken. If the blood was drawn for culture prior to the blood for polymerase chain reaction, this may have “washed out” the wire lumen. Discarding the initial blood volume has been described to reduce contamination of both blood products during donation2 and blood cultures.3

References

Levin PD, Moss J, Stohl S, et al. Use of the nonwire central line hub to reduce blood culture contamination. Chest. 2013;143(3):640-645. [PubMed]
 
Liumbruno GM, Catalano L, Piccinini V, Pupella S, Grazzini G. Reduction of the risk of bacterial contamination of blood components through diversion of the first part of the donation of blood and blood components. Blood Transfus. 2009;7(2):86-93. [PubMed]
 
Patton RG, Schmitt T. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique. J Clin Microbiol. 2010;48(12):4501-4503. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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Tables

References

Levin PD, Moss J, Stohl S, et al. Use of the nonwire central line hub to reduce blood culture contamination. Chest. 2013;143(3):640-645. [PubMed]
 
Liumbruno GM, Catalano L, Piccinini V, Pupella S, Grazzini G. Reduction of the risk of bacterial contamination of blood components through diversion of the first part of the donation of blood and blood components. Blood Transfus. 2009;7(2):86-93. [PubMed]
 
Patton RG, Schmitt T. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique. J Clin Microbiol. 2010;48(12):4501-4503. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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