0
Correspondence |

Relationship Between Sleep Parameters and Lipid Profile With Special Reference to the Validity of ActigraphySleep Parameters and Lipid Profile FREE TO VIEW

Tomoyuki Kawada, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Nippon Medical School.

Correspondence to: Tomoyuki Kawada, MD, Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bukyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602, Japan; e-mail: kawada@nms.ac.jp


Editor’s Note: Authors are invited to respond to Correspondence that cites their previously published work. Those responses appear after the related letter. In cases where there is no response, the author of the original article declined to respond or did not reply to our invitation.

Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;145(1):183. doi:10.1378/chest.13-1830
Text Size: A A A
Published online
To the Editor:

I read with interest the article by Toyama et al1 in a recent issue of CHEST (March 2013). They conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between sleep indicators and lipid profiles in 275 working men. OSA and sleep duration were judged by specific devices. Among them, I have some concerns about the device Actiwatch (Philips Respironics) and its ability to determine sleep duration.

First, the authors mentioned in the Materials and Methods section that sleep duration was estimated from analysis of actigraphy tracings in conjunction with a sleep diary. Unfortunately, they did not describe procedures, and they cited only one reference for the use of actigraphy to estimate sleep-wake time.2 There is a review on the usefulness of actigraphy,3 but systemic discrepancies between actigraphy and EEG-defined sleep also exist. For example, subjects generally become inactive in a sleep-induction period, which would relate to the underestimation of sleep-onset latency.4

Second, there are several commercially based actigraphs and different scoring methods that do not have the same performance for the detection of sleep-wake judgment.5 I have a query on the information of validation for Actiwatch, which was used by Toyama et al.1 Actigraphy is an accelerometer and it does not reflect sleep itself. The cutoff value of sensitivity for making sleep/wake judgment by Actiwatch was initially set at 40 Hz. If possible, the cutoff value should be determined in each test situation by using sleep polysomnography as a gold standard.

The authors described mean (SD) of sleep duration in their Table 1 as 6.12 (0.72) and 5.93 (0.86) in subjects without dyslipidemia and with dyslipidemia, respectively. They also categorized subjects into four groups according to sleep duration in their Table 2. Furthermore, sleep duration was also used for a stepwise linear regression model to predict several lipid profiles. I think that the stable estimates of sleep duration are important for their study, and I strongly recommend that the authors describe precisely the procedure of actigraphy tracings in conjunction with sleep diary.

References

Toyama Y, Chin K, Chihara Y, et al. Association between sleep apnea, sleep duration, and serum lipid profile in an urban, male, working population in Japan. Chest. 2013;143(3):720-728. [PubMed]
 
Morgenthaler T, Alessi C, Friedman L, et al; Standards of Practice Committee; American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Practice parameters for the use of actigraphy in the assessment of sleep and sleep disorders: an update for 2007. Sleep. 2007;30(4):519-529. [PubMed]
 
Martin JL, Hakim AD. Wrist actigraphy. Chest. 2011;139(6):1514-1527. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Lichstein KL, Stone KC, Donaldson J, et al. Actigraphy validation with insomnia. Sleep. 2006;29(2):232-239. [PubMed]
 
Boudebesse C, Leboyer M, Begley A, et al. Comparison of five actigraphy scoring methods with bipolar disorder. Behav Sleep Med. 2013;11(4):275-282. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

Figures

Tables

References

Toyama Y, Chin K, Chihara Y, et al. Association between sleep apnea, sleep duration, and serum lipid profile in an urban, male, working population in Japan. Chest. 2013;143(3):720-728. [PubMed]
 
Morgenthaler T, Alessi C, Friedman L, et al; Standards of Practice Committee; American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Practice parameters for the use of actigraphy in the assessment of sleep and sleep disorders: an update for 2007. Sleep. 2007;30(4):519-529. [PubMed]
 
Martin JL, Hakim AD. Wrist actigraphy. Chest. 2011;139(6):1514-1527. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Lichstein KL, Stone KC, Donaldson J, et al. Actigraphy validation with insomnia. Sleep. 2006;29(2):232-239. [PubMed]
 
Boudebesse C, Leboyer M, Begley A, et al. Comparison of five actigraphy scoring methods with bipolar disorder. Behav Sleep Med. 2013;11(4):275-282. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543