0
Original Research: Asthma |

The Preventable Burden of Productivity Loss Due to Suboptimal Asthma ControlProductivity Loss and Clinical Control in Asthma: A Population-Based Study

Mohsen Sadatsafavi, MD, PhD; Roxanne Rousseau, BSc; Wenjia Chen, MSc; Wei Zhang, PhD; Larry Lynd, PhD; J. Mark FitzGerald, MD; the Economic Burden of Asthma Study Team*
Author and Funding Information

From the Institute for Heart and Lung Health (Drs Sadatsafavi and FitzGerald and Ms Rousseau), Department of Medicine; Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation (Drs Sadatsafavi and FitzGerald); Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Ms Chen and Dr Lynd); and the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (Drs Zhang and Lynd), the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Correspondence to: Mohsen Sadatsafavi, MD, PhD, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, 7th Floor, 828 W 10th Ave, Research Pavilion, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada; e-mail: msafavi@mail.ubc.ca


*A complete list of the study team members can be found in e-Appendix 1.

Funding/Support: This study is funded through the Collaborative Innovative Research Fund, an investigator-initiated, peer-reviewed competition sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline Canada.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;145(4):787-793. doi:10.1378/chest.13-1619
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Productivity loss is an overlooked aspect of the burden of chronic health conditions. While modern guidelines emphasize achieving clinical control in asthma management, few studies have reported on the relationship between asthma control and productivity loss. We calculated the productivity loss that can be avoided by achieving and maintaining clinical control in employed adults with asthma.

Methods:  We prospectively recruited a population-based random sample of adults with asthma in British Columbia, Canada. We measured productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism using validated instruments, and ascertained asthma control according to the GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) classification. We estimated the average gain in productivity for each individual if the individual’s asthma was controlled in the past week, by fitting two-part regression models associating asthma control and productivity loss, controlling for potential confounding variables.

Results:  The final sample included 300 employed adults (mean age, 47.9 years [SD 12.0]; 67.3% women). Of these, 49 (16.3%) reported absenteeism, and 137 (45.7%) reported presenteeism. Productivity loss due to presenteeism, but not absenteeism, was associated with asthma control. A person with uncontrolled asthma would avoid $184.80 (Canadian dollars [CAD]) in productivity loss by achieving clinical control during a week, CAD$167.50 (90.6%) of which would be due to presenteeism. The corresponding value was CAD$34.20 for partially controlled asthma and was not statistically significant.

Conclusions:  Our results indicate that substantial gain in productivity can be obtained by achieving asthma control. Presenteeism is more responsive than absenteeism to asthma control, and, thus, is a more important source of preventable burden.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543