0
Original Research: COPD |

Native American Ancestry, Lung Function, and COPD in Costa RicansNative American Ancestry, Lung Function, COPD

Wei Chen, PhD; John M. Brehm, MD; Nadia Boutaoui, PhD; Manuel Soto-Quiros, MD; Lydiana Avila, MD; Bartolome R. Celli, MD, FCCP; Shannon Bruse, PhD; Yohannes Tesfaigzi, PhD; Juan C. Celedón, MD, DrPH, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Immunology (Drs Chen, Brehm, Boutaoui, and Celedón), Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA; Division of Pediatric Pulmonology (Drs Soto-Quiros and Avila), Hospital Nacional de Niños, San José, Costa Rica; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr Celli), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA; and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (Drs Bruse and Tesfaigzi), Albuquerque, NM.

Correspondence to: Juan C. Celedón, MD, DrPH, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, 4401 Penn Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15224; e-mail: juan.celedon@chp.edu


Drs Chen and Brehm contributed equally to this article.

Funding/Support: This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health [Grant R01-HL073373] and by Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;145(4):704-710. doi:10.1378/chest.13-1308
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Whether Native American ancestry (NAA) is associated with COPD or lung function in a racially admixed Hispanic population is unknown.

Methods:  We recruited 578 Costa Ricans with and without COPD into a hybrid case-control/family-based cohort, including 316 members of families of index case subjects. All participants completed questionnaires and spirometry and gave a blood sample for DNA extraction. Genome-wide genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human610-Quad and HumanOmniExpress BeadChip kits (Illumina Inc), and individual ancestral proportions were estimated from these genotypic data and reference panels. For unrelated individuals, linear or logistic regression was used for the analysis of NAA and COPD (GOLD [Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease] stage II or greater) or lung function. For extended families, linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations were used for the analysis. All models were adjusted for age, sex, educational level, and smoking behavior; models for FEV1 were also adjusted for height.

Results:  The average proportion of European, Native American, and African ancestry among participants was 62%, 35%, and 3%, respectively. After adjustment for current smoking and other covariates, NAA was inversely associated with COPD (OR per 10% increment, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.75) but positively associated with FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC. After additional adjustment for pack-years of smoking, the association between NAA and COPD or lung function measures was slightly attenuated. We found that about 31% of the estimated effect of NAA on COPD is mediated by pack-years of smoking.

Conclusions:  NAA is inversely associated with COPD but positively associated with FEV1 or FVC in Costa Ricans. Ancestral effects on smoking behavior partly explain the findings for COPD but not for FEV1 or FVC.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543