0
Point/Counterpoint Editorials |

Point: Should Paralytic Agents Be Routinely Used in Severe ARDS? YesUse Paralytics for Severe ARDS: Yes

Jesse B. Hall, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Anesthesia & Critical Care and Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of Chicago.

Correspondence to: Jesse B. Hall, MD, FCCP, Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of Chicago, 924 E 57th St, Ste 104, Chicago, IL 60637-5415; e-mail: jhall@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;144(5):1440-1442. doi:10.1378/chest.13-1460
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

The ICU syndrome of acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe subset, ARDS, results in an enormous health burden in the United States and worldwide.1 Importantly, the health consequences of ARDS have been shown to persist in many patients up to 5 years after discharge from the ICU, if not permanently. The need for improvement in the care and outcomes for these patients is clear.

Cell and animal model investigations coupled with translational studies in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation for ALI/ARDS have greatly extended our knowledge about the interaction of the injured lung and the ventilator.2 Much evidence supports the concepts that both overdistension of the lung and repetitive opening and closing of alveoli can result in lung injury and even the generation of inflammatory mediators by the lung that can have both local and systemic adverse effects. Accordingly, patients with ALI/ARDS can sustain further lung damage through ventilator-induced lung injury mechanisms that confounds their ability to recover from initial lung insults.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543