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Obstructive Lung Diseases |

Characteristics of COPD Patients reporting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency in the Lung Disease Health Check Database

Tyler McGrady, BS; David Mannino, MD; Byron Thomashow, MD; Elisha Malanga, BS; John Walsh, BS
Author and Funding Information

University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY


Chest. 2013;144(4_MeetingAbstracts):1028A. doi:10.1378/chest.1782322
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Abstract

SESSION TITLE: COPD

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Slide

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 02:45 PM - 03:45 PM

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine the differences in demographics, smoking habits, pulmonary function, symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients reporting and not reporting alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD).

METHODS: Data from WebMD’s Lung Disease Health Check, available on WebMD.com, was analyzed, limited to patients who reported a COPD diagnosis (N=177,865). Of these, 1,619 (0.91%) reported A1AD. Comparisons between COPD patients with and without reported A1AD were done using chi-squares.

RESULTS: Compared to COPD patients without reported A1AD those with A1AD were more likely to be male (45.3% vs. 37.3%, p < 0.001) and under the age of 35 (11.4% vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001). They were more likely to be never smokers (22.2% vs 18.9%, p < 0.001). COPD patients reporting A1AD were more likely to know their FEV1 (26.4% vs 14.4%, p < 0.001), and were more likely to report severe impairment (FEV1 < 50% predicted, 13.0% vs. 3.4%, p < 0.001). They were more likely to report tightness in the chest (50.6% vs. 44.7%, p < 0.001), less likely to report wheezing (50.4% vs. 55.4%, p < 0.001) and chronic cough (45.9% vs. 51.4%, p < 0.001), and similar in the report of breathlessness (84.9% vs 84.6%, p=0.747). They were also more likely to report severe or very severe impairment of their work life (34.1% vs 25.8%, p < 0.001) and home life (34.5% vs. 29.0%, p < 0.001). COPD patients in both categories were similar in their reported prevalence of diabetes (10.7% vs. 12.0%, p=0.107), heart disease (13.3% vs. 14.0%, p< 0.448), depression (23.5% vs. 22.2%, p= 0.282), and gastric reflux (27.6% vs.27.5%, p=0.963). They had a lower prevalence of hypertension (28.5% vs. 34.6%, p < 0.001) but a higher prevalence of osteoporosis (13.0% vs. 11.0%, p=0.009).

CONCLUSIONS: COPD patients with A1AD have important differences from COPD patients without A1AD, including more severe lung function impairment and worse quality of life.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: COPD patients with A1AD are an inportant subset of the COPD patient population.

DISCLOSURE: David Mannino: Grant monies (from industry related sources): Grants from GSK, Pfizer, Novartis, AstraZeneca, Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: GSK, Pfizer, Novartis, AstraZeneca, Fiduciary position (of any organization, association, society, etc, other than ACCP: Board of Directors, COPD Foundation Byron Thomashow: Fiduciary position (of any organization, association, society, etc, other than ACCP: Board of Directors, COPD Foundation Elisha Malanga: Fiduciary position (of any organization, association, society, etc, other than ACCP: Employee of COPD Foundation John Walsh: Fiduciary position (of any organization, association, society, etc, other than ACCP: CEO COPD Foundation and Alpha-1 Foundation The following authors have nothing to disclose: Tyler McGrady

No Product/Research Disclosure Information


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