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Obstructive Lung Diseases |

Utility of Sniff Nasal Inspiratory Pressure in Assessment of Inspiratory Muscle Strength in North Indians

Randeep Guleria, DM; Nipum Arora, MD; Surya Bhatt, PhD
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Departments of Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India


Chest. 2013;144(4_MeetingAbstracts):742A. doi:10.1378/chest.1701632
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Abstract

SESSION TITLE: Dyspnea in COPD

SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Slide

PRESENTED ON: Sunday, October 27, 2013 at 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

PURPOSE: Purpose: Measurement of respiratory muscle function is important in the diagnosis of respiratory muscle disease, or respiratory muscle dysfunction. We examine the utility of sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) as a non-invasive method of assessing inspiratory muscle strength in normal subjects and in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD) and patients with intestinal lung disease (ILD).

METHODS: Method: We studied a total of 57 subjects, out of which 24 patients with COAD, 10 patients with ILD and 23 normal subjects were studied. Clinical examination, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), pulmonary function tests, SNIP, sniff esophageal pressure (SnPes) and pulmonary diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide were investigated.

RESULTS: Results: In patients with COAD, MIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.79). SNIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.97). MEP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.65). In patients with ILD, MIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.81). SNIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.99). MEP was found to correlate significantly with Sn Pes (r=0.65). In patients with ILD, MIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r= 0.67). SNIP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.95). MEP was found to correlate significantly with SnPes (r=0.54). Multiple linear regression analysis was carried out between SnPes and SNIP and various parameters. Height was found to be the only significant predictor of SnPes, SNIP and MIP in all three groups. In addition, forced expired volume was found to be a predictor of MIF in patients of COAD while age was found to be a predictor of MIP in normal subjects.

CONCLUSIONS: Conclusion: We conclude that measurements of SNIP is one occluded nostril sniffs performed through the contralateral nostril provide a reliable estimation of SnPes in normal subjects and patients with COAD and ILD in north Indian subjects

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Contralateral nostril provide a reliable estimation of SnPes in patients with COAD and ILD

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Randeep Guleria, Nipum Arora, Surya Bhatt

No Product/Research Disclosure Information


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