0
Original Research: Chest Infections |

Risk Factors for and Outcomes of Detention of Patients With TB in New York CityOutcomes of Detention in Patients With TB: An Update: 2002-2009

Seema Pursnani, MD, MPH; Sumeet Srivastava, MPH, MBA; Saleem Ali, MD; Eric Leibert, MD, FCCP; Linda Rogers, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the New York University School of Medicine (Drs Pursnani, Ali, Leibert, and Rogers), New York, NY; and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Dr Pursnani and Mr Srivastava), Baltimore, MD.

Correspondence to: Linda Rogers, MD, FCCP, 550 First Ave, New York University School of Medicine, New Bellevue 7N24, New York, NY 10016; e-mail: linda.rogers@nyumc.org


A preliminary analysis of these data were presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference, May 14-19, 2010, New Orleans, LA (Abstract 386).

Funding/Support: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2014;145(1):95-100. doi:10.1378/chest.13-0324
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  One of the most controversial aspects of New York City’s highly effective TB control program is the use of public health law and court-ordered detention to treat persistently recalcitrant patients with active TB. We now report on characteristics and outcomes of patients undergoing detention for completion of TB treatment due to nonadherence in New York City from 2002 through 2009.

Methods:  A retrospective cohort study was designed to compare patients undergoing court-ordered detention (n = 79) and time-matched control subjects undergoing TB treatment in outpatient directly observed therapy (DOT) at Bellevue Hospital in New York City.

Results:  From January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2009, 79 patients underwent court-ordered detention for TB treatment. Compared with patients completing treatment in DOT, univariate analysis found that detainees were younger; more likely to be of minority race/ethnicity; to have a history of substance abuse, tobacco use, homelessness, incarceration, HIV infection; and to be born in the United States. Multivariate analysis adjusting for other variables found smear positivity (OR = 3.93; 95% CI, 1.05-14.75; P = .04), mental illness (OR = 5.80; 95% CI, 1.18-28.51; P = .03), and substance abuse (OR = 9.25; 95% CI, 2.81-30.39; P < .01) to be the strongest independent predictors of likelihood of detention. Of those initially detained, 46 (58%) completed treatment during inpatient detention, 29(37%) completed treatment under outpatient court-ordered DOT, and four died during their hospitalization.

Conclusions:  The majority of patients undergoing court-ordered detention for TB treatment (95%) successfully completed therapy. Likelihood of detention was most strongly associated with factors expected to be associated with poor adherence, including mental illness and substance abuse.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543