0
Original Research: Signs and Symptoms of Chest Diseases |

Evaluating Cough Assessment ToolsEvaluation of Cough Assessment Tools: A Systematic Review

Kristine M. Schmit, MD, MPH; Remy R. Coeytaux, MD, PhD; Adam P. Goode, PhD, PT, DPT; Douglas C. McCrory, MD, MHS; William S. Yancy, Jr, MD, MHSc; Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH; Vic Hasselblad, PhD; Brooke L. Heidenfelder, PhD; Gillian D. Sanders, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Community and Family Medicine (Dr Schmit), Doctor of Physical Therapy Division (Drs Coeytaux and Goode), Department of Medicine (Drs McCrory, Yancy, and Sanders), Department of Pediatrics (Dr Kemper), and Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics (Dr Hasselblad), Duke University School of Medicine; Duke Evidence-based Practice Center (Drs Coeytaux, McCrory, Heidenfelder, and Sanders), Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University; and Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care (Drs McCrory and Yancy), Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC.

Correspondence to: Kristine M. Schmit, MD, MPH, Duke Clinical Research Institute, PO Box 17969, Durham, NC 27715; e-mail: kristine.schmit@duke.edu


Funding/Support: This project was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, US Department of Health and Human Services [Contract 290-2007-10066-I].

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;144(6):1819-1826. doi:10.1378/chest.13-0310
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Little is known about the comparative validity, reliability, or responsiveness of instruments for assessing cough frequency or impact, where the term impact encompasses both cough severity and the impact of cough on health-related quality of life.

Methods:  We conducted a systematic review to evaluate instruments that assess cough frequency or impact in adults, adolescents, and children with acute or chronic cough.

Results:  Seventy-eight studies were included, of which eight were randomized controlled trials and 70 were observational studies. In all age groups, audio and video electronic recording devices had good reliability compared with other methods of assessing cough frequency but had variable correlation with other cough assessments, such as visual analog scale scores, quality-of-life questionnaires, cough diaries, and tussigenic challenges. Among adult and adolescent patients, the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) and the Cough-Specific Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (CQLQ) were valid and reliable, showing high intraclass and test-retest correlations. Among children, the Parent Cough-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire and Pediatric Cough Questionnaire were valid and reliable.

Conclusions:  Electronic recording devices can be valid assessments of cough frequency. The LCQ and CQLQ for adults and the Parent Cough-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire for children are valid instruments for assessing cough impact. There is limited but insufficient evidence to determine the reliability or concurrent validity of the different types of cough diaries or visual analog scale scores. There are also limited data to support the responsiveness of recording devices. There is good responsiveness data for the LCQ and CQLQ, but more evidence is needed.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543