0
Original Research: Imaging |

Perfluoropropane Gas as a Magnetic Resonance Lung Imaging Contrast Agent in HumansPerfluoropropane Gas as Contrast Agent in Lung MRI

Ahmed F. Halaweish, PhD; Richard E. Moon, MD, FCCP; W. Michael Foster, PhD; Brian J. Soher, PhD; H. Page McAdams, MD, FCCP; James R. MacFall, PhD; Maureen D. Ainslie, MS; Neil R. MacIntyre, MD, FCCP; H. Cecil Charles, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Radiology (Drs Halaweish, Soher, MacFall, and Charles and Ms Ainslie); Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine (Drs Moon, Foster, and MacIntyre); Department of Anesthesiology (Dr Moon), GVTU Division; Department of Radiology (Dr McAdams), Division of Chest Radiology; and Department of Radiology (Drs Halaweish and Charles and Ms Ainslie), Duke Image Analysis Laboratory, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham NC.

Correspondence to: H. Cecil Charles, PhD, Duke Image Analysis Laboratory, Duke University School of Medicine–Radiology, DUMC 2702, Durham, NC 27710; e-mail: cecil.charles@dm.duke.edu


Data from this study have been reported at two conferences (Soher B, Ainslie M, MacFall J, Hashoian R, Charles HC. Lung imaging in humans at 3T using perflourinated gases as MR contrast agents. 2010 Annual Meeting of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, May 2010, Stockholm, Sweden; and Charles HC, MacFall J, Moon R, et al. Initial experience with perfluorinated gases as lung imaging contrast agents in humans. 2011 American Thoracic Society International Conference, May 2011, Denver, CO).

Funding/Support: This study was funded in part by a W. H. Coulter Foundation Translational Partnership Research Award.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;144(4):1300-1310. doi:10.1378/chest.12-2597
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Fluorine-enhanced MRI is a relatively inexpensive and straightforward technique that facilitates regional assessments of pulmonary ventilation. In this report, we assess its suitability through the use of perfluoropropane (PFP) in a cohort of human subjects with normal lungs and subjects with lung disease.

Methods:  Twenty-eight subjects between the ages of 18 and 71 years were recruited for imaging and were classified based on spirometry findings and medical history. Imaging was carried out on a Siemens TIM Trio 3T MRI scanner using two-dimensional, gradient echo, fast low-angle shot and three-dimensional gradient echo, volumetric, interpolated, breath-hold examination sequences for proton localizers and PFP functional scans, respectively. Respiratory waveforms and physiologic signals of interest were monitored throughout the imaging sessions. A region-growing algorithm was applied to the proton localizers to define the lung field of view for analysis of the PFP scans.

Results:  All subjects tolerated the gas mixture well with no adverse side effects. Images of healthy lungs demonstrated a homogeneous distribution of the gas with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, while lung images from asthmatic and emphysematous lungs demonstrated increased heterogeneity and ventilation defects.

Conclusions:  Fluorine-enhanced MRI using a normoxic PFP gas mixture is a well-tolerated, radiation-free technique for regionally assessing pulmonary ventilation. The inherent physical characteristics and applicability of the gaseous agent within a magnetic resonance setting facilitated a clear differentiation between normal and diseased lungs.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543