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Pectoriloquy |

Chest Tube FREE TO VIEW

Kyle T. Amber, BS
Author and Funding Information

Editor’s Note: The poet writes, “As a medical student standing in the trauma resuscitation bay, I witnessed the placement of a chest tube into a patient with a tension pneumothorax. As the patient sprung to life, I felt inspired to capture both the sight and sounds of this experience in a poem.” Kyle T. Amber is a medical student at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Editor’s note for authors of submissions to Pectoriloquy: Poems should not exceed 350 words, should not have been previously published, and should be related to concerns of physicians and medicine. First submissions to the Pectoriloquy Section should be submitted via e-mail to poetrychest@aol.com. Authors of accepted poems will be asked to submit the final version to CHEST Manuscript Central.

Michael Zack, MD, FCCP

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(6):1832. doi:10.1378/chest.12-2656
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Published online

Gasp he cried with the sound of the breeze
  Hollow and empty as the air swirled.
As bubbles shattered through the calm surface
 So did vivacity through the empty whispers.
 The roar of the lion sang with ferocity
 Muting beeps and concerned whispers.
Ignorant of the pandemonium he growled at last
 As others stood in silence short of breath.


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