0
Diagnosis and Management of Lung Cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines Online Only Articles |

Palliative and End-of-Life Care in Lung CancerPalliative and End-of-Life Care: Diagnosis and Management of Lung Cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines

Dee Walker Ford, MD, FCCP; Kathryn A. Koch, MD, FCCP; Daniel E. Ray, MD, FCCP; Paul A. Selecky, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care Allergy, and Sleep Medicine (Dr Ford), Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; Munroe Regional Medical Center (Dr Koch), Ocala, FL; Lehigh Valley Health Network (Dr Ray), Allentown, PA; and Hoag Memorial Hospital (Dr Selecky), Newport Beach, CA.

Correspondence to: Dee Walker Ford, MD, FCCP, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Dr, Charleston, SC 29425; e-mail: fordd@musc.edu


Funding/Sponsors: The overall process for the development of these guidelines, including matters pertaining to funding and conflicts of interest, are described in the methodology article.1 The development of this guideline was supported primarily by the American College of Chest Physicians. The lung cancer guidelines conference was supported in part by a grant from the Lung Cancer Research Foundation. The publication and dissemination of the guidelines was supported in part by a 2009 independent educational grant from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

COI Grids reflecting the conflicts of interest that were current as of the date of the conference and voting are posted in the online supplementary materials.

Disclaimer: American College of Chest Physician guidelines are intended for general information only, are not medical advice, and do not replace professional medical care and physician advice, which always should be sought for any medical condition. The complete disclaimer for this guideline can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.1435S1.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(5_suppl):e498S-e512S. doi:10.1378/chest.12-2367
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  In the United States, lung cancer is a major health problem that is associated with significant patient distress and often limited survival, with some exceptions. The purpose of this article is to address the role of palliative and end-of-life care in the management of patients with lung cancer and to address the need for good communication skills to provide support to patients and families.

Methods:  This article is based on an extensive review of the medical literature up to April 2012, with some articles as recent as August 2012. The authors used the PubMed and Cochrane databases, as well as EBESCO Host search, for articles addressing palliative care, supportive care, lung neoplasm, and quality of life in cancer or neoplasm, with no limitation on dates. The research was limited to human studies and the English language.

Results:  There was no “definitive” work in this area, most of it being concurrence based rather than evidence based. Several randomized controlled trials were identified, which are reviewed in the text. The article focuses on the assessment and treatment of suffering in patients with lung cancer, as well as the importance of communication in the care of these patients over the course of the disease. The aim of medical care for patients with terminal lung cancer is to decrease symptom burden, enhance the quality of remaining life, and increase survival benefit. A second objective is to emphasize the importance of good communication skills when addressing the needs of the patient and his or her family, starting at the time of diagnosis, which in itself is a life-changing event. Too often we do it poorly, but by using patient-centered communication skills, the outcome can be more satisfactory. Finally, the article addresses the importance of advance care planning for patients with lung cancer, from the time of diagnosis until the last phase of the illness, and it is designed to enhance the physician’s role in facilitating this planning process.

Conclusions:  This article provides guidance on how to reduce patient distress and avoid nonbeneficial treatment in patients with lung cancer. The goal is to decrease symptom burden, enhance quality of life, and increase survival benefit. Good communication and advance care planning are vital to the process.


Sign In to Access Full Content

Want to Purchase a Subscription?

New to CHEST? Become an ACCP member to receive a full subscription to both the print and online editions.
Want to access your Institution's subscription?
Sign in to your individual user account while you are actively authenticated on this website via your institution (Learn more about institutional authentication). We will then sustain your personal access to their content/subscription for 90 days, after which you can repeat this process.

Sign In to Access Full Content

Want to Purchase a Subscription?

New to CHEST? Become an ACCP member to receive a full subscription to both the print and online editions.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
CHEST Collections
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543