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Special Features: Global Medicine |

Lung Cancer in ChinaLung Cancer in China: Challenges and Interventions

Jun She, MD, PhD; Ping Yang, MD, PhD; Qunying Hong, MD, PhD; Chunxue Bai, MD, PhD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Pulmonary Medicine (Drs She, Hong, and Bai), Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; and Department of Health Sciences Research (Dr Yang), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Correspondence to: Chunxue Bai, MD, PhD, FCCP, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Feng Lin Rd, Shanghai, 200032, China; e-mail: bai.chunxue@zs-hospital.sh.cn


Funding/Support: Supported in part by the Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project [Project Number B115]; the third program of “973”: “Early detection of lung cancer”; and the third program of “985”: “Research on cancer metastases and the clinical translation.” Dr Yang was supported by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(4):1117-1126. doi:10.1378/chest.11-2948
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In 2008, lung cancer replaced liver cancer as the number one cause of death among people with malignant tumors in China. The registered lung cancer mortality rate increased by 464.84% in the past 3 decades, which imposes an enormous burden on patients, health-care professionals, and society. We performed a systematic review of the published data on lung cancer in China between 1990 and 2011 to analyze the incidence and mortality rates, economic burden, and risk factors of cancer and the effectiveness of interventions. Lung cancer incidence varies within China. People in eastern China, especially women, likely have a higher risk of developing lung cancer than those in western China. The crude mortality rates from lung cancer in 2008 were 47.51 per 100,000 men and 22.69 per 100,000 women. The crude mortality rate was highest in Shanghai (76.49 per 100,000 men and 35.82 per 100,000 women) and lowest in Tibet (25.14 per 100,000 men) and Ningxia (12.09 per 100,000 women). Smoking and environmental pollution are major risk factors for lung cancer in China. Continuous efforts should be concentrated on education of the general public regarding lung cancer to increase prevention and early detection. Specific interventions need to be implemented to reduce smoking rates and environmental risk factors. Standardized treatment protocols should be adapted in China.

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