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Original Research: Sleep Disorders |

Association Between Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration, and Serum Lipid Profile in an Urban, Male, Working Population in JapanLipids, Sleep Duration, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Yoshiro Toyama, MD; Kazuo Chin, MD, PhD; Yuichi Chihara, MD, PhD; Misa Takegami, RN, MP; Ken-ichi Takahashi, MD, PhD; Kensuke Sumi, MD, PhD; Takaya Nakamura, MD, PhD; Yukiyo Nakayama-Ashida, MEng; Itsunari Minami, PhD; Sachiko Horita, RN, MN; Yasunori Oka, MD; Tomoko Wakamura, PhD, RN; Shun-ichi Fukuhara, MD; Michiaki Mishima, MD, PhD; Hiroshi Kadotani, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Respiratory Medicine (Drs Toyama, Chihara, and Mishima), Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine (Dr Chin), Horizontal Medical Research Organization (Ms Nakayama-Ashida and Dr Minami), Center for Genomic Medicine (Dr Kadotani), Environmental Health Nursing, Human Health Sciences (Dr Wakamura), Graduate School of Medicine; Department of Epidemiology and Healthcare Research (Ms Takegami and Dr Fukuhara), Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto University, Kyoto; Department of Prevalence Medicine and Epidemiologic Informatics (Ms Takegami), Research and Development Initiative Center, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka; Department of Respiratory Medicine (Dr Takahashi), Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga; Department of Respiratory Medicine (Dr Sumi), National Hospital Organization Minami Kyoto Hospital, Kyoto; Department of Respiratory Medicine (Dr Nakamura), Kyoto City Hospital, Kyoto; Department of Human Nursing (Ms Horita), Faculty of Human Health, Sonoda Women’s University, Hyogo; and the Department of Sleep Control Medicine (Dr Oka), Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime University, Ehime, Japan.

Correspondence to: Kazuo Chin, MD, PhD, Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoin 54, Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan; e-mail: chink@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp


Funding/Support: This work was supported in part by grants from the following: Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology [22590860, 23659109, and 22249031]; Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (Respiratory Failure Research Group and Health Science Research grants: Comprehensive Research on Lifestyle-related Diseases including Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes Mellitus); the Japan Vascular Disease Research Foundation; PRESTO JST (Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, Japanese Science and Technology Agency); Suzuken Memorial Foundation; Takeda Science Foundation; Mitsui Life Social Welfare Foundation; Chiyoda Kenko Kaihatsu Jigyodan Foundation; and Health Science Center Foundation.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(3):720-728. doi:10.1378/chest.12-0338
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Background:  Dyslipidemia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but few population-based studies have investigated their relationship. Short sleep duration is associated with hypertension and diabetes; however, its association with dyslipidemia is not well known. We investigated relationships among OSA, sleep duration, and the lipid profile in a community-based study.

Methods:  We measured the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) and sleep duration by a type 3 portable device and actigraph in 275 men in a Japanese company. Fasting blood parameters were obtained from periodic inspection data.

Results:  According to Japanese criteria, 143 subjects had dyslipidemia. Percent sleep time of oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) < 90% and prevalence of severe OSA were greater and sleep duration and mean SpO2 during sleep were lower in subjects with dyslipidemia than in those without. Univariate analysis showed that the RDI was positively correlated with serum triglyceride (TG) levels (ρ = 0.20, P < .01), and sleep duration was negatively correlated with serum total cholesterol (TC) levels (γ = −0.13, P = .03) and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (γ = −0.12, P = .04). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that TG was correlated with RDI (β = 0.14, P = .02), BMI (β = 0.20, P < .01), and alcohol intake (β = 0.20, P < .01), and that TC was correlated with sleep duration (β = −0.13, P = .03), age (β = 0.15, P = .02), and waist/hip ratio (β = 0.15, P = .02).

Conclusions:  Short sleep duration was associated with TC levels and RDI was positively associated with TG levels among working-aged men in an urban Japanese company. Correcting the status of OSA and/or short sleep duration might improve the lipid profile and cardiovascular consequences.

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