0
Editorials |

Home Sleep Testing for Obstructive Sleep ApneaSleep Apnea and Portable Monitoring: One Night Is Enough!

Naresh M. Punjabi, MD, PhD, FCCP; R. Nisha Aurora, MD; Susheel P. Patil, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Medicine (Drs Punjabi, Aurora, and Patil) and the Department of Epidemiology (Dr Punjabi), Johns Hopkins University.

Correspondence to: Naresh M. Punjabi, MD, PhD, FCCP, Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center, 5501 Hopkins Bayview Circle, Baltimore, MD 21224; e-mail: npunjabi@jhmi.edu


Funding/Support: This article was supported by the National Institutes of Health [Grant HL07578].

Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST the following conflicts of interest: Dr Patil was a paid consultant in the development of a home sleep-testing triage system for Sleep Services of America, Inc, a GE company. Drs Punjabi and Aurora have reported that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(2):291-294. doi:10.1378/chest.12-2699
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder with a prevalence in the range of 5% to 15% in the general population.1 Untreated OSA is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for several health-related consequences, including hypertension,2,3 cardiovascular disease,4 stroke,5,6 and all-cause mortality.7 Undiagnosed OSA is also associated with higher rates of health-care use8,9 and potentially imposes an estimated burden of $3.4 billion in added medical costs annually in the United States.10 Despite increasing awareness and identification by health-care professionals, OSA frequently remains unrecognized and underdiagnosed, even in patients with moderate to severe disease.11,12 The rather low level of case identification of OSA in the general community can be attributed, in part, to the inconvenience and cost associated with in-laboratory polysomnograms. Furthermore, some rural areas may not have the necessary testing facilities or the trained personnel, which adds to the incongruence between the current demand and availability of diagnostic services.13 With advances in technology and the development of portable monitors, home testing for sleep-related breathing disorders is now feasible and circumvents many of the limitations of an attended in-laboratory polysomnogram. In fact, in 2007, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved the use of portable monitoring for OSA, thereby increasing the means for diagnosing the disorder and potentially shortening the lead time for starting positive pressure therapy for many patients. In this issue of CHEST (see page 539), Nelson14 describes various types of out-of-center tests for OSA, along with their respective coding and billing procedures.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543