0
Correspondence |

Consider Talc Too in Poorly Controlled Asthma and Unexplained BronchiolitisTalc and Bronchiolitis FREE TO VIEW

Andrew R. L. Medford, MBChB, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the North Bristol NHS Trust Lung Centre, Southmead Hospital.

Correspondence to: Andrew R. L. Medford, MBChB, MD, FCCP, North Bristol NHS Trust Lung Centre, Southmead Hospital, Southmead Rd, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, BS10 5NB, England; e-mail: andrewmedford@hotmail.com


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(1):278a-279. doi:10.1378/chest.12-2200
Text Size: A A A
Published online
To the Editor:

The case report of talc endobronchitis highlighted by Ong and Takano1 in an issue of CHEST (August 2012) is a useful reminder of a different mode of presentation of talc-related lung disease. They highlighted the four more common syndromes, but it is worth noting that talc-related lung disease should also be considered in the differential of unexplained bronchiolitis or poorly controlled asthma, as previously reported.2 In this case, the patient had documented asthma not responding to treatment, with evidence of unexplained bronchiolitis on cross-sectional imaging and no other explanation on intensive investigation. The surgical lung biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of talc-related nodular granulomatous infiltrates with a peribronchiolar distribution as well as a perivascular fibrosis, and subsequent occupational history confirmed probable talc exposure through work as a dental technician. (French talc was used to produce a high luster on plaster models of teeth in the past.)

In summary, it is worth considering talc-related lung disease in poorly controlled asthma or unexplained bronchiolitis in addition to severe endobronchitis and the other more common syndromes summarized by Ong and Takano.1 As ever, a corroborative occupational history is key.

References

Ong TH, Takano A. Severe endobronchitis and airway stricture caused by inhalation of cosmetic talc. Chest. 2012;142(2):511-513. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Medford ARL, Sheppard MN, Nicholson AG, Geddes DM, Phillips GD. An unusual case of difficult asthma: talc granulomatous disease. Grand Rounds. 2005;5:1-3.
 

Figures

Tables

References

Ong TH, Takano A. Severe endobronchitis and airway stricture caused by inhalation of cosmetic talc. Chest. 2012;142(2):511-513. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Medford ARL, Sheppard MN, Nicholson AG, Geddes DM, Phillips GD. An unusual case of difficult asthma: talc granulomatous disease. Grand Rounds. 2005;5:1-3.
 
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543