0
Original Research: Diffuse Lung Disease |

The Red Cell Distribution Width as a Prognostic Indicator in Idiopathic Pulmonary FibrosisRBC Distribution Width as a Prognostic Indicator

Steven D. Nathan, MD, FCCP; Taylor Reffett; A. Whitney Brown, MD; Chelsea P. Fischer; Oksana A. Shlobin, MD, FCCP; Shahzad Ahmad, MD; Nargues Weir, MD, FCCP; Michael J. Sheridan, ScD
Author and Funding Information

From the Advanced Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Program (Drs Nathan, Brown, Shlobin, Ahmad, and Weir; Mss Reffett and Fischer), Department of Medicine; and the Inova Research Center (Dr Sheridan), Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA.

Correspondence to: Steven D. Nathan, MD, FCCP, Advanced Lung Disease and Transplant Program, Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, 3300 Gallows Rd, Falls Church, VA 22042; e-mail: steven.nathan@inova.org


Funding/Support: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2013;143(6):1692-1698. doi:10.1378/chest.12-1368
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  The course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by variable patterns of disease progression. The red cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter that is routinely reported with all CBC counts. We sought to test the prognostic usefulness of this parameter in a well-defined cohort of patients with IPF.

Methods:  CBCs, demographics, and pulmonary function data from patients with IPF evaluated between January 1997 and June 2011 were collated. Patient outcomes were ascertained from the program’s database and the Social Security Death Index.

Results:  There were 319 patients with IPF evaluated in whom baseline CBCs were available. The range in the RDW was 11.9 to 21.9 (median 14.1). There were 228 subjects with RDW values ≤ 15 (normal) and 91 patients with RDW values > 15. Patients with normal RDW values had a median survival of 43.1 months compared with 16.3 months for those whose RDW was > 15 (P = .001). There were 198 patients with available serial RDW data. Those patients who had a change in the RDW of less or greater than +0.010/mo had median survivals of 43.0 and 23.9 months, respectively (P = .0246).

Conclusions:  The RDW is a readily available laboratory test result that may provide important, independent prognostic information at baseline and follow-up in patients with IPF. Further studies are warranted to validate this as a biomarker for IPF outcomes, as well as to define the biologic basis for this association.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543