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Pulmonary Physiology |

Body Composition of COPD Patients Indicated to Ambulatory Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program

Vladimir Koblizek*, PhD; Sarka Pracharova; Miloslav Hronek, PhD; Miroslav Kovarik, PhD; Vladimir Palicka, PhD; Ladislava Pavlikova; Kamil Klenha; Petr Celakovsky, PhD; Jan Brozik; Jana Tuckova
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Pulmonary Department, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic


Chest. 2012;142(4_MeetingAbstracts):790A. doi:10.1378/chest.1389401
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Abstract

SESSION TYPE: Physiology/PFTs/ Rehabilitation II

PRESENTED ON: Monday, October 22, 2012 at 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM

PURPOSE: We know that body weight and muscle wasting are significant determinants of exercise tolerance. Patients with COPD can be classified into six body composition categories (obesity, overweight, normal, cachexia, semistarvation and sarcopenia). The incidence of each category is not fully clarified. We wanted to find out the real occurrence of each body composition category in group of COPD subjects indicated for ambulatory pulmonary rehabilitation course.

METHODS: Multicomponent assessment of 38 (GOLD group classification A 1, B 21, C O, D 16) consecutive patients (6 females, 66,7 ± 7,6 years) with stable COPD (post- ipratropium and salbutamol FEV1 57,7%) before rehabilitation in university hospital. We calculated body composition from the formula developed by Durnin and Womersley (variables of this formula involve measuring of four skinfold sites: triceps, biceps, subscapular and suprailiac). Simultaneously we use bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

RESULTS: The most common body composition types were overweight and obesity (40%, 26%), 14% of subjects had normal nutritional status and 8% of participants suffered from cachexia. The last 12% of the patients were symmetrically divided between semistarvation and sarcopenic groups. BMI and FFMI correlated positively with the following functional parameters (DLCO% and IC/TLC%). On the contrary, BMI and FFMI did not correlate with post bronchodilator FEV1. The apparent weight loss (more than 10% in the past 6 months) was not observed in any patient.

CONCLUSIONS: Majority of COPD patients admitted for ambulatory pulmonary rehabilitation did not have depletion of FFM.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Sarcopenia and cachexia are not frequent manifestations of COPD, however exactly the patients with this disease phenotype may have the greatest benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation programs.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Vladimir Koblizek, Sarka Pracharova, Miloslav Hronek, Miroslav Kovarik, Vladimir Palicka, Ladislava Pavlikova, Kamil Klenha, Petr Celakovsky, Jan Brozik, Jana Tuckova

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Pulmonary Department, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic

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