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Occupational and Environmental Lung Diseases |

Deployment-Related Pulmonary Symptoms and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Military Personnel

Paul Hiles*, MD; William Porr, MD; Joseph Abraham, PhD; Michael Morris, MD
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San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX


Chest. 2012;142(4_MeetingAbstracts):745A. doi:10.1378/chest.1389112
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Abstract

SESSION TYPE: Occupational/ Environmental Lung Disease

PRESENTED ON: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 04:30 PM - 05:45 PM

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in cardiopulmonary exercise (CPEX) testing between deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel undergoing a clinical evaluation for dyspnea.

METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of all CPEX studies performed at our institution on active duty military personnel during a clinical evaluation for dyspnea. All CPEX studies had been performed on a bicycle ergometer to maximum exercise tolerance. Review of CPEX studies identified values from expired gas analysis related to cardiac, respiratory, and conditioning as limitations to exercise. Further review of their clinical evaluation identified pulmonary function testing, medical history, and deployment history.

RESULTS: 287 patients were identified who completed testing and values from 99 patients have been reviewed. The cohort was predominantly male (82%) and 51% had been deployed. Comparison of patient demographics in the deployed vs. non-deployed groups showed no differences in age (31.2 vs. 31.3 yrs) or BMI (27.5 vs. 26.8). Exercise capacity was similar for maximum work rate (174.7 vs.172.3 watts), max VO2 (2.45 vs. 2.12 L/min) and anaerobic threshold (1.29 vs. 1.35 L/min). No differences were noted in cardiovascular parameters; heart rate response (50.9 vs. 49.5), O2 pulse (14.7 vs. 12.7), or heart rate reserve (22.9 vs. 21.8). Respiratory parameters were also normal in both groups; VEmax/MVV (0.67 vs. 0.67). VT/IC (0.67 vs. 0.63) and max RR (41.6 vs. 41.3 breaths).

CONCLUSIONS: This CPEX data suggests there are no differences in measured parameters between deployed and non-deployed personnel. Furthermore, there was no significant increase in dyspnea evaluations or underlying pulmonary disease in deployed military personnel.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Deployment to OIF/OEF has not resulted in more patients undergoing evaluation for dyspnea that required evaluation with CPEX. Patients had an equivalent exercise ability while comparison of CPEX testing values did not demonstrate differences in overall cardiovascular conditioning, cardiovascular limitations or respiratory limitation to exercise as related to deployment.

DISCLOSURE: Michael Morris: Consultant fee, speaker bureau, advisory committee, etc.: Paid speaker for Pfizer/Boehringer-Ingelheim for Spiriva

The following authors have nothing to disclose: Paul Hiles, William Porr, Joseph Abraham

No Product/Research Disclosure Information

San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX

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