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Chest Infections |

Sentinel Surveillance for Severe Acute Respiratory Infections in Cairo University Hospitals (2009-2010)

Ashraf Hatem, MD; Amani Elkholy, MD; Usama Abuelhassan*, MSCE; Hossam Masoud, MD
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Kasr Alaini, Cairo, Egypt


Chest. 2012;142(4_MeetingAbstracts):227A. doi:10.1378/chest.1388661
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Abstract

SESSION TYPE: Respiratory Infections Posters II

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

PURPOSE: Severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) are the leading cause of morbidity worldwide and a significant cause of mortality in infants and children less than 5 years. Respiratory surveillance data in Egypt are sparse and information specific to SARI is lacking. In order to assess this knowledge gap, a sentinel surveillance system for SARI was implemented in Cairo University Hospitals (CUH) to describe the epidemiology of SARI and identify viral and atypical bacterial etiologies of SARI.

METHODS: SARI surveillance was implemented at CUH a 5000 bed tertiary care hospital during the period of 2009-2010. All hospitalized patients meeting the WHO case definition for SARI were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and samples were tested using rt-PCR for influenza A, B, RSV, hMPV, parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1,2,3, and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, and Legionella).

RESULTS: Out of 410 patients enrolled, 370 (90%) agreed to provide NP/OP swabs, 57% were males, 45% were children less than 18 years, and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 68 (19%) patients were found to have a viral etiology, 15 (20%) were influenza, 39(53%) RSV, 20 (27%) other viruses, and 6 cases (8%) were co-infections. Children less than 18 yrs had a higher viral etiology (78%) compared to 22% of adults. Pandemic influenza was detected in 9 specimens in 2010. In all, no specimens had atypical bacteria. X-ray confirmed pneumonia (50%) and/or preexisting chronic medical conditions (69%) were common. RSV infections occurred seasonally with the majority of patients presenting from February to March. However, minimal seasonality was observed for SARI or the other specific pathogens.

CONCLUSIONS: Viral infections are a common cause of SARI in Egypt, especially in children less than 18 years. RSV appears to occur seasonally during the winter. Ongoing continuous surveillance will better describe the epidemiology of SARI and will provide specific data to enable decision-makers to take appropriate prevention measures.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Viral infections are a common cause of SARI in Egypt.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Ashraf Hatem, Amani Elkholy, Usama Abuelhassan, Hossam Masoud

No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Kasr Alaini, Cairo, Egypt

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