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Occupational and Environmental Lung Diseases |

Screening Spirometry for Assessment of Pulmonary Disease in Active Duty Military Personnel

Nicholas Ondrasik*, DO; Thomas Zanders, DO; Michael Morris, MD; Georgette Haislip, RRT
Author and Funding Information

San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX


Chest. 2012;142(4_MeetingAbstracts):753A. doi:10.1378/chest.1384221
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Abstract

SESSION TYPE: Occupational/ Environmental Lung Disease Posters

PRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at 01:30 PM - 02:30 PM

PURPOSE: Recent debate has emerged regarding the incidence of pulmonary pathology in deployed soldiers returning from Southwest Asia. Invasive evaluations may identify an underlying pathology even when pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are normal in symptomatic subjects. Requiring pre-deployment PFTs may provide a baseline study to distinguish new respiratory disease in redeploying soldiers. This study is investigating the feasibility of performing baseline screening spirometry in an active duty population. This evaluation will determine the prevalence of abnormal values requiring additional testing during screening of this general population.

METHODS: Active duty military personnel 18-35 years old will be recruited for this two phase study with the first phase aiming to enroll 2000 subjects. Phase I participants complete a questionnaire and undergo screening spirometry. Subjects with abnormal spirometry findings, along with matched controls, will be asked to participate in the second phase in which they will undergo further pulmonary function testing.

RESULTS: Phase I (initial screening spirometry) has 131 participants to date. The majority of spirometry values are normal with 12.9% of subjects having at least one spirometric abnormality requiring additional testing. Of these abnormalities, 8 (6.1%) suggested a restrictive defect and 7(5.3%) had an obstructive defect. Two (1.5%) abnormalities were noted only on the flow-volume loops. None of the subjects with any history of asthma or asthma medication use were noted to have spirometric abnormalities.

CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary data suggests that medical history of asthma does not correlate with findings of abnormal spirometry in this population at the time of entry into the military. However, further data is required to determine if this is relationship is true and delineate the feasibility of screening spirometry.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: If abnormal spirometry can reliably diagnose underlying pulmonary pathology, it may be advantageous for the military to consider spirometry as routine screening for military recruits in certain at risk populations.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Nicholas Ondrasik, Thomas Zanders, Michael Morris, Georgette Haislip

No Product/Research Disclosure Information

San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX

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