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Original Research: Asthma |

Asthma Action Plans and Patient Satisfaction Among Women With AsthmaAsthma Action Plans and Patient Satisfaction

Minal R. Patel, MPH; Melissa A. Valerio, PhD, MPH; Georgiana Sanders, MD; Lara J. Thomas, MPH; Noreen M. Clark, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Center for Managing Chronic Disease (Mss Patel and Thomas and Drs Valerio, Sanders, and Clark), University of Michigan; Department of Health Behavior and Health Education (Ms Patel and Drs Valerio and Clark), University of Michigan School of Public Health; and Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (Dr Sanders), Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Correspondence to: Noreen M. Clark, PhD, Center for Managing Chronic Disease, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029; e-mail: nmclark@umich.edu


For editorial comment see page

Funding/Support: This research was supported by the Division of Lung Diseases of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health [Grant 1 R18 HL60884-01].

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2012;142(5):1143-1149. doi:10.1378/chest.11-1700
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Background:  Asthma action plans (AAPs) are a priority recommendation of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program and have been shown to positively affect health outcomes. Patient satisfaction is an important clinical outcome, yet little is known about its association with receiving an AAP. This study examined the association between having an AAP and behaviors to keep asthma in control and patient satisfaction with care.

Methods:  The study design was a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a randomized trial evaluating a self-management program among 808 women with asthma. Participants reported demographic information, interactions with clinicians, whether they had an AAP and owned a peak flow meter, self-management behaviors, and symptoms.

Results:  The mean age of the participants was 48 ± 13.6 years, 84% (n = 670) were satisfied with their asthma care, and 48% (n = 383) had a written AAP from their physician. Women not having an AAP were less likely to take asthma medication as prescribed [χ2(1) = 13.68, P < .001], to initiate a discussion about asthma with their physicians [χ2(1) = 26.35, P < .001], and to own a peak flow meter [χ2(1) = 77.84, P < .001]. Adjusting for asthma control, income, and medical specialty, women who did not have an AAP were more likely to report dissatisfaction with their asthma care (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.35-3.17; P < .001).

Conclusions:  Women without an AAP were less likely to initiate discussions with their physicians, take medications as prescribed, and own a peak flow meter to monitor asthma, all considered important self-management behaviors. They were also less satisfied with their care. Not having an AAP may affect interactions between patient and physician and clinical outcomes.


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