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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

LUNG FUNCTION AMONG EARLY ADOLESCENTS DELIVERED TERM WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT FREE TO VIEW

Joje B. Undar, MD*; Anna Marie Concepcio S. Putulin, MD; Anthony P. Calibo, MD
Author and Funding Information

Fellow in training, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Institute of Pulmonary Med, Quezon City, Philippines



Chest. 2006;130(4_MeetingAbstracts):241S. doi:10.1378/chest.130.4_MeetingAbstracts.241S-b
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Abstract

PURPOSE: The objective of the study is to determine the correlation of present lung function of early adolescents who were delivered term, healthy and with LBW. Furthermore, the authors would like to determine differences in mean Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) among subjects with history of maternal and passive smoking, asthma and pneumonia.

METHODS: In this cross sectional study, 41 subjects, in early adolescence (10-13 years old) delivered term healthy with LBW (< 2.5kg) underwent pulmonary function test to determine FEV1 and FVC. Other recorded information included birth weight, present weight and height, body mass index (BMI), smoking and childhood illnesses.

RESULTS: There is a weak correlation between LBW and lung function studies among early adolescence (Spearman’s correlation coefficient range 0.002 –0.160 or less than +1, p-values 0.17 –0.495) No statistically significant difference in mean FEV1 and FVC values were noted among those with history of maternal smoking, passive smoking and asthma. Only those with history of pneumonia at less than 2 years old had statistically significant mean predicted FVC values (p-value 0.042).

CONCLUSION: We therefore conclude that LBW has a weak correlation with FEV1 and FVC among early adolescents.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The authors recommend that parental education and physician initiated efforts in promoting wellness aimed at preserving normal lung growth pre and postnatally, should be aggressively pursued. Further longitudinal studies involving larger sample size and a longer follow-up period is encouraged to further investigate the issues fetal or childhood insults that may be the basis for adult diseases.

DISCLOSURE: Joje Undar, None.

Wednesday, October 25, 2006

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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