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Abstract: Slide Presentations |

SPIROMETRY SCREENING AND AN INVITATION TO QUIT FROM A STATE TOBACCO QUIT LINE AS MOTIVATORS FOR SMOKING CESSATION AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING ADULTS FREE TO VIEW

Diana Hackbarth, RN, PhD*; Robert A. Cohen, MD, FCCP; Lynda Preckwinkel, RRT; Lori Younker; Christa McKee; Jeanine Solinski, MPP; Rhonda Williams, MES; Kristen Donnelly, MPH; Diane Ernst, RN, MSN; Cynthya Campbell
Author and Funding Information

Loyola University, Chicago, IL



Chest. 2006;130(4_MeetingAbstracts):145S. doi:10.1378/chest.130.4_MeetingAbstracts.145S-a
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Abstract

PURPOSE: Consumer knowledge of their own lung function has been hypothesized to be a motivator for smoking cessation but results of studies examining the impact of spriometry screening on subsequent quit rates have been mixed. In addition, there is little data on the efficacy of active contact of smokers by state tobacco quit lines as a trigger for quitting behaviors. This study examines the impact of both spirometry screening and active telephone contact on subsequent quitting attempts 6 months and 12 months following spirometry screening.

METHODS: The study is part of a larger initiative in which 2400 adults sought free spirometry screening in pharmacies in the Chicago metropolitan area in 2005-2006. The 380 screening participants who were smokers (16%) were randomized into two groups. The “active quit line “ group received a telephone call from the Illinois Tobacco Quit Line inviting them to participate in telephone counseling to quit smoking . The “usual care” group was provided with the number of the Quit Line but not contacted to offer services. A separate 6 and 12 month follow-up telephone survey of all spirometry participants includes items on quitting attempts among smokers.

RESULTS: Data collection and analysis is preliminary. 44% of smokers contacted by the Quit Line received counseling and/or mailed information; 26% declined telephone counseling stating they were “not ready to quit”; and 30% did not respond. The 6 month follow-up survey revealed that almost half of smokers reported quitting attempts and 14% were successful. 58% of all respondents indicated they were concerned about their lung health and more than one third stated that spirometry had a moderate or significant effect on plans to change health related behaviors.

CONCLUSION: Spirometry screening and active invitations for telephone counseling may be motivators for behavior change and move smokers forward along a continuum of readiness to change.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Spirometry may not only be diagnostic but may also play a therapeutic role in smokers being screened for COPD.

DISCLOSURE: Diana Hackbarth, None.

Tuesday, October 24, 2006

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM


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