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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

U.S. BORN ASIAN INDIANS HAVE HIGHER PULMONARY FUNCTION VALUES COMPARED TO IMMIGRANT ASIAN INDIANS FREE TO VIEW

Ahmet S. Copur, MD; Ashok Fulambarker, MD*; Mark E. Cohen, PhD; Monali Patel; Sanjay Gill; George Chacko, RRT; Joseph K. Rosman, MD; Frank Maldonado, MD
Author and Funding Information

Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science/The Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, IL


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):392S-b-393S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.392S-b
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  To evaluate differences in pulmonary function between US born Asian Indians and immigrant Asian Indians that might be attributable to environmental and socioeconomic factors.

METHODS:  We constructed regression equations to predict forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75) in 90 male and 90 female healthy, non-smoking US born Asian Indians and 160 male and 90 female healthy, non-smoking immigrant Asian Indians, using Age and Height as predictors, as well as these predictors in combination with the binary country of origin variable. Age range in both groups was 18-35. Values were obtained by using a Spirolab spirometer, following strict ATS guidelines.

RESULTS:  The regression equations for each sex from each country of origin are shown in Table 1. When data for countries were combined and Country was considered as an independent variable in the regression, P-values for Country approached significance for Males (0.0655, 0.0958, 0.3739) and were significant for females (<0.0001, <0.0001, 0.0925) for FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75, respectively. As shown in Table 2, US born subjects had higher values for all measurements.

CONCLUSION:  US Born, Asian Indian men and women had greater pulmonary function values compared to immigrant Asian Indians. These differences approached statistical significance for men and were significant for women.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  The differences in pulmonary function between these groups could be attributed to differences in environmental and socioeconomic factors. Table 1—

Prediction Equations for US Born and Immigrant Asian Indian Men and Women

US Born Asian Indian MenFVC = -3.378 + (0.0426)*HT + (0.0111)*Age R2=0.183FEV1= -1.562 + (0.0317)*HT + (-0.0100)*Age R2=0.1513FEF25-75= -2.909 + (0.0151)*HT + (-0.0504)*Age R2=0.026Immigrant Asian Indian MenFVC= -4.382 + (0.0498)*HT + (-0.0080)*Age R2=0.2860FEV1=-2.339 + (0.0374)*HT + (-0.0249)*Age R2=0.3224FEF25-75=1.979 + (0.0208)*HT + (-0.0597)*Age R2=0.094US Born Asian Indian WomenFVC= -2.575 + (0.0329)*HT + (0.0173)*Age R2=0.2875FEV1= -1.272+ (0.0243)*HT + (0.0072)*Age R2=0.2081FEF25-75= -30.94 + (0.1716)*HT + (0.3634)*Age R2=0.0257Immigrant Asian Indian WomenFVC=-0.700 + (0.0223)*HT + (-0.0011)*Age R2=0.1664FEV1= -0.403 + (0.0197)*HT + (-0.0099)*Age R2=0.2074FEF25-75= 1.452+ (0.0145)*HT + (-0.0320)*Age R2=0.0813Table 2—

Typical Pulmonary Function Values Derived for a 25 Year Old Man With a Height of 1.75 Meters and a 25 Years Old Woman With a Height of 1.65 Meters.

TESTUS Born AsianIndian MenImmigrantAsianIndian MenUS BornAsianIndian WomenImmigrant Asian Indian WomenFVC=4.354.133.292.95FEV1=3.743.592.922.60FEF25-75=4.294.136.463.04

DISCLOSURE:  Ashok Fulambarker, None.

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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